Updates - articles


Articles
70000 Tons Of Metal 2016 - Part Two: Why You Should REALLY Go In 2017

Yes! It's that time of the year again. In less than a month I shall sip foo-foo drinks on board a cruise ship while listening to some kick-ass metal bands. 70000 Tons Of Metal here I come.

Read more ››
Posted: 08.01.2017 by D.T. Metal | Comments (3)

Articles
High In Heaven, Stoned In Hell: Exploring The Meads Of Asphodel

If you make a list of some of the most ardent rule breakers and innovators within the international metal community, you damn well better have The Meads Of Asphodel on that list. The band is an enigma, and a highly tantalizing one at that. Black metal, folk, neolassical, electronica, punk, or whatever else they feel like, and wrapped in interesting themes of Biblical and Jewish history, the time has come for an in depth exposé of this curious group.

Read more ››
Posted: 03.01.2017 by Apothecary | Comments (13)

Articles
Getting Into: Maximum The Hormone

The articles in this series begun by our own Baz Anderson are designed to give a brief overview of a band's entire discography, so as to provide a clear point of entry for the uninitiated. It offers a different approach from the typical review format, for the curious newcomer to a well-traveled band.

Maximum The Hormone
Hardcore, alternative metal, nu metal, J-rock, punk
Japan

Maximum The Hormone is a band of contrasts: jovial pop-punk choruses and screeching, metallic verses; groovy, percussive beatdowns and free-spirited rock'n'roll sing-alongs; crude, colorful humor and periodic forays into a dark, desperate undercurrent. With a versatile, three-pronged vocal apparatus, an electrifying and outspoken rhythm section, and the songwriting expertise and attention to detail necessary to utilize the band's prodigious talents, Maximum The Hormone has evolved over the years so as to be unrecognizable from its original incarnation. Founded in 1998 by drummer Nao Kawakita and vocalist Daisuke Tsuda, Maximum The Hormone originated as a merely a quirky hardcore punk band; it is in this guise that the band, rounded out by bassist Key and guitarist Sugi, released its debut, A.S.A. Crew. Shortly afterwards, the latter two members departed, to be replaced by bassist Futoshi Uehara and guitarist/clean vocalist Ryo Kawakita, Nao's younger brother. Under Ryo's aegis, the band evolved into an unpredictable behemoth characterized by chameleonic style shifts and uncommonly memorable songwriting. It would be safe to say that Maximum The Hormone is primarily known in the West for providing the opening and ending themes for the 2006 anime Death Note, namely "What's Up, People?!" and "Zetsubou Billy," both featured on the band's 2007 album Buiikikaesu, but there is a lot more to the band's career and signature style.

Read more ››
Posted: 29.11.2016 by ScreamingSteelUS | Comments (3)

Articles
Getting Into: Maximum The Hormone

The articles in this series begun by our own Baz Anderson are designed to give a brief overview of a band's entire discography, so as to provide a clear point of entry for the uninitiated. It offers a different approach from the typical review format, for the curious newcomer to a well-traveled band.

Maximum The Hormone
Hardcore, alternative metal, nu metal, J-rock, punk
Japan

Maximum The Hormone is a band of contrasts: jovial pop-punk choruses and screeching, metallic verses; groovy, percussive beatdowns and free-spirited rock'n'roll sing-alongs; crude, colorful humor and periodic forays into a dark, desperate undercurrent. With a versatile, three-pronged vocal apparatus, an electrifying and outspoken rhythm section, and the songwriting expertise and attention to detail necessary to utilize the band's prodigious talents, Maximum The Hormone has evolved over the years so as to be unrecognizable from its original incarnation. Founded in 1998 by drummer Nao Kawakita and vocalist Daisuke Tsuda, Maximum The Hormone originated as a merely a quirky hardcore punk band; it is in this guise that the band, rounded out by bassist Key and guitarist Sugi, released its debut, A.S.A. Crew. Shortly afterwards, the latter two members departed, to be replaced by bassist Futoshi Uehara and guitarist/clean vocalist Ryo Kawakita, Nao's younger brother. Under Ryo's aegis, the band evolved into an unpredictable behemoth characterized by chameleonic style shifts and uncommonly memorable songwriting. It would be safe to say that Maximum The Hormone is primarily known in the West for providing the opening and ending themes for the 2006 anime Death Note, namely "What's Up, People?!" and "Zetsubou Billy," both featured on the band's 2007 album Buiikikaesu, but there is a lot more to the band's career and signature style.

Read more ››
Posted: 29.11.2016 by ScreamingSteelUS | Comments (0)