Rating:
N/A
Riverside - Shrine Of New Generation Slaves
18 January 2013


Disc I
01. New Generation Slave
02. The Depth Of Self-Delusion
03. Celebrity Touch
04. We Got Used To Us
05. Feel Like Falling
06. Deprived (Irretrievably Lost Imagination)
07. Escalator Shrine
08. Coda

Disc II [Limited Edition Mediabook]
01. Night Session - Part One
02. Night Session - Part Two


After hearing the single "Celebrity Touch", many have feared (or hoped) that Riverside would, like a lot of prog bands in recent years (Pain Of Salvation, Opeth, Dark Suns to name a few) find their new permanent address in the 70's - the decade's dirtier, grittier rock or its prog. That was not the case, luckily, since what we got instead is much more interesting than the prospect of Riverside turning to the past - they turned to the future.

Back in 2009, on Anno Domini High Definition, they broke out of the style boundaries set by their first three albums and apparently this set a pattern for the future, as Shrine Of New Generation Slaves is not a continuation of the previous album, noticeably in approach to songwriting and its very form (unless you count an album title that can be cleverly abbreviated into similarities), and in what it sounds like, although it's still the same Riverside we know and love. The rhythm tandem of Mariusz Duda and Piotr Kozieradzki is still as tight and driving, Piotr Grudzinski's guitar solos are still as well-timed and blistering, Michał Łapaj's choice of synth sounds is ever tasteful and appropriate (the beginning of "Escalator Shrine" gives me huge "Riders On The Storm" vibes!!) and Mariusz's vocal melodies are just as bittersweet as when we last witnessed them in action. But they've set new challenges for themselves while making this record and that can be felt throughout.

While A. D. H. D. consisted of five lengthy tracks with many nooks and crannies to explore, songs on, ehm, S. O. N. G. S. are more concise and more immediate than anything Riverside's done up to this point. Some will miss the feeling of having found a shelter in a dark forest after finishing a Riverside album, or miss their unpredictability, but I think it's a good thing they've demonstrated they can write deliberately focusing on the single song format while not damaging the flow of the album, as many bands have failed trying just that. Sonically, Shrine is less heavy and less groovy than Anno Domini, but it is darker in places, especially those reminiscent of their early days and the Reality Dream trilogy.

The lyrical dimension, as always, works with the musical one to Riverside's advantage. What I like about Riverside is that, when they talk about the problems of modern life as they do here, what they will focus on is the place of age-old human problems and conflicts in a modern environment, and not how all our problems supposedly begin and end with estrangement which results from abuse of technology. Rather, they are simply made worse by it.

Well-rounded, crafted with love, Shrine Of New Generation Slaves offers authenticity and warmth to compensate for the fallacies of life, and brings with it a glimmer of hope. Maybe we are "set to rise" and maybe we won't remain "incarcerated between floors of hope and disappointment" if we only try and "sift the babble from what really counts". And if honest music doesn't count, I don't know what does.


Band profile: Riverside
Album: Shrine Of New Generation Slaves


 



Written on 09.03.2013 by
Milena
A part of the team since December 2011, writes about the progressive, the sad and the melodic. She's nice until she's not.
More reviews by Milena ››



Comments

‹‹ Back to the Reviews
Comments: 26  
Users visited: 241  
Search this topic:  


Fredd - 09.03.2013 at 12:45  
A well-rounded review, crafted with love.
K†ulu - 09.03.2013 at 14:35  
Well, I guess you said it all, and it is also great to hear that you talk about tastefulness of keyboard, lyrical themes, well-roundedness and, what's the most important, honesty. I was just listening to some songs of SONGS today + I have listened to the whole Riverside discography the other day, and what I thought of today is that Riverside don't do bullshit. They talk about real things, they write real songs, and they don't overdo anything. What I mean is when Mariusz wants to scream he does, and it works in those parts, but he does not do anything unnatural, just like the rest of the band. They just remain themselves, and they are not trying to prove anything to somebody, and look at their marvelous discography. Take any song, and it's a single. It's a separate idea. You can pretty much call any of their album SONGS.
BloodTears - 09.03.2013 at 16:42  
It's curious to see that when people like Riverside, they like the whole of Riverside, at least the people I've met have a great connection to the band.

This review is very honest. When I reviewed Rapid Eye Movement I felt that need as well. It was also my first review for MS, which is kinda special. Back on topic...

I really love this album and how this band constantly grows. At every album, they cement their status as a band. It's undeniable how talented they are and their discography speaks for itself. Don't know how they do it, but it really never disappoints me.
tea[m]ster - 09.03.2013 at 16:51  
I applaud bands for wanting to expand their musical direction by exploring other avenues of influence but 70's prog rock? Ugh. Opeth, Dark Suns, Steve Wilson have already lost me and now Riverside is on it's way. Their is something to be said about bands like Dream Theater putting out similar record after record because it's "safe" and will not alienate a particular fan base. It is after all prog metal. My favorite band of all time, Rush, have different musical eras but at least the 70's prog rock era was well, in the 70's!
K†ulu - 09.03.2013 at 18:09  
Well, I should say, though, that having listened to the album 8 times, I still can't get into it. Something is still unsatisfying. I don't know, maybe I a looking for hooks a la ADHD... don't know... Memories in my Head took unbelievable number of listens to really start liking (even after I wrote the review), but it will be the same here... I don't know, maybe it will click sometime I will be walking from work contemplating my life...
embracing - 09.03.2013 at 19:56  
Great review. I was sure you were gonna review this one
Weird how this is less metal than ADHD, but somehow this is what sits well for them. This is what they do awesomely.
Let's see what they'll do in Leipzig tomorrow night :D especially alongside Jolly (the other awesome album holder of this year).
Fritillaria - 09.03.2013 at 20:21  
Written by tea[m]ster on 09.03.2013 at 16:51

I applaud bands for wanting to expand their musical direction by exploring other avenues of influence but 70's prog rock? Ugh. Opeth, Dark Suns, Steve Wilson have already lost me and now Riverside is on it's way. Their is something to be said about bands like Dream Theater putting out similar record after record because it's "safe" and will not alienate a particular fan base. It is after all prog metal. My favorite band of all time, Rush, have different musical eras but at least the 70's prog rock era was well, in the 70's!

well said !
Susan - 09.03.2013 at 21:35  
And if honest music doesn't count, I don't know what does.

Truer words were never spoken!!!!!!
Dark Blood - 10.03.2013 at 08:55  
You nailed it Milena. And so did Riverside... again.

I've been listening to this album a lot in the last few days, and it's one of those that gets me hooked and after a few days break my brain calls me into it again. Yeah... that's the Riverside I've known since "Out of Myself".
Merchant of Doom - 10.03.2013 at 11:54  
Honest music? How can be honest music when you just copy 70s prog and quite badly too? This album is a huge disappointment, on par with Steve Wilson's latest. They are just self-centred wankery (although the The Raven takes the biscuit). Boring, boring, boring. Inoffensive, harmless, innocuous music for bankers. Now shoot me!
K†ulu - 10.03.2013 at 14:05  
Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 11:54

Honest music? How can be honest music when you just copy 70s prog and quite badly too?

So who do they copy I am wondering? To me they quite like themselves on this album, even if it is different.
Merchant of Doom - 10.03.2013 at 14:23  
Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 14:05

Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 11:54

Honest music? How can be honest music when you just copy 70s prog and quite badly too?

So who do they copy I am wondering? To me they quite like themselves on this album, even if it is different.



They don't copy anybody in particular (unlike SW), it's the general feel and the use of some instruments (and how they are used). I grew up with 70s prog (yes, I'm old), so to me it's even more irritating. I suppose if you are young and quite new to 70s' influenced prog, you'll like it. To me, it just sounds like a bad re-hash of old stuff. Where's the grumpy icon?
K†ulu - 10.03.2013 at 14:37  
Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 14:23

Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 14:05

Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 11:54

Honest music? How can be honest music when you just copy 70s prog and quite badly too?

So who do they copy I am wondering? To me they quite like themselves on this album, even if it is different.



They don't copy anybody in particular (unlike SW), it's the general feel and the use of some instruments (and how they are used). I grew up with 70s prog (yes, I'm old), so to me it's even more irritating. I suppose if you are young and quite new to 70s' influenced prog, you'll like it. To me, it just sounds like a bad re-hash of old stuff. Where's the grumpy icon?

Yeah, I am not that familiar with 70's prog. I have listened to some Camel, first King Crimson Record, a little of Yes, and some Pink Floyd, and that's pretty much it, and out of these SONGS reminds me of Pink Floyd at times, but nothing else.

I am not particularly enthralled by this new record; I think it's the weakest that they have yet had to offer, but for me it has nothing to do with the style. It's about the content.
Merchant of Doom - 10.03.2013 at 14:56  
Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 14:37


I am not particularly enthralled by this new record; I think it's the weakest that they have yet had to offer, but for me it has nothing to do with the style. It's about the content.


yes, there's some Pink Floyd in that too. I agree with your comment above. I think I'm even more annoyed because the songs are weak. If they did a better job, it would have been more bearable, I guess!
K†ulu - 10.03.2013 at 15:03  
Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 14:56

Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 14:37


I am not particularly enthralled by this new record; I think it's the weakest that they have yet had to offer, but for me it has nothing to do with the style. It's about the content.


yes, there's some Pink Floyd in that too. I agree with your comment above. I think I'm even more annoyed because the songs are weak. If they did a better job, it would have been more bearable, I guess!

But are you familiar with their other albums because I am wondering whether you are comparing this album to their previous or you just think the songs are not good?
R'Vannith - 10.03.2013 at 15:06  
70's prog is just a byword for the style of the album, this has a thoroughly modern sound to me.
Merchant of Doom - 10.03.2013 at 15:22  
Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 15:03

But are you familiar with their other albums because I am wondering whether you are comparing this album to their previous or you just think the songs are not good?


I have most of them, but the ones I enjoyed most were the first two, "Second Life Syndrome" and "Rapid Eye Movement". They were well crafted, much more original and fresh. The songs on the new album are just weak, also in comparison with the albums I mentioned.
Unhealer - 10.03.2013 at 15:42  
Written by R'Vannith on 10.03.2013 at 15:06

70's prog is just a byword for the style of the album, this has a thoroughly modern sound to me.


Yes, be sure the sound of the album is modern, but I agree that for the compositions they took a look into the past. Not sure if 70's, it sometimes makes me think of 80's music or maybe late 70's.
A.D.H.D was a record modern on every aspect.
R'Vannith - 10.03.2013 at 15:50  
Written by Unhealer on 10.03.2013 at 15:42

Written by R'Vannith on 10.03.2013 at 15:06

70's prog is just a byword for the style of the album, this has a thoroughly modern sound to me.


Yes, be sure the sound of the album is modern, but I agree that for the compositions they took a look into the past. Not sure if 70's, it sometimes makes me think of 80's music or maybe late 70's.
A.D.H.D was a record modern on every aspect.


I think many people think always "70's prog" when they look for a target for claims of unoriginality. The style here could have as easily been influenced by a neo-progressive sound beyond the 70's. Of course it all comes down to those influential prog rock legends inspiring an identifiable style within the progressive rock/metal genre.

But I think this sounds very fresh. I mean stylistically you can draw many comparisons to 70's prog (or otherwise 80's, 90's perhaps) but it all sounds like a modern interpretation of that sound to me. I don't understand why bands that use this approach are seen these days as just rehashing old ideas. They compose their OWN music with 70's prog, as influential as it is, as a key inspiration. Yet the sound bands like Riverside produce is completely modern to me. It doesn't simply borrow or clone, it reinterprets (or perhaps even reinvents), with all the modern trappings like the wonderful production job that only modern technology can give. And the songwriting isn't just something they've ripped from a Pink Floyd cassette, it's all of their own composition.
Unhealer - 10.03.2013 at 16:53  
Written by R'Vannith on 10.03.2013 at 15:50

They compose their OWN music with 70's prog, as influential as it is, as a key inspiration. Yet the sound bands like Riverside produce is completely modern to me. It doesn't simply borrow or clone, it reinterprets (or perhaps even reinvents), with all the modern trappings like the wonderful production job that only modern technology can give. And the songwriting isn't just something they've ripped from a Pink Floyd cassette, it's all of their own composition.


Yup, this is a band that already found a sound of it's own, they'd have to try very hard to sound unoriginal. Still I think their sound has been lovingly looking to older prog from the very start, I'd have preferred this specific band had looked elsewhere for a change. Opeth and Dark Suns "going 70's" was one thing, Pain Of Salvation's case was different as well... in the case of Riverside (and Steven Wilson maybe), it feels somewhat redundant.
K†ulu - 10.03.2013 at 17:25  
Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 15:22

Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 15:03

But are you familiar with their other albums because I am wondering whether you are comparing this album to their previous or you just think the songs are not good?


I have most of them, but the ones I enjoyed most were the first two, "Second Life Syndrome" and "Rapid Eye Movement". They were well crafted, much more original and fresh. The songs on the new album are just weak, also in comparison with the albums I mentioned.

Out of Myself and Second Life Syndrome you mean. The first one is just very special.
Merchant of Doom - 10.03.2013 at 17:53  
Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 17:25

Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 15:22

Written by K†ulu on 10.03.2013 at 15:03

But are you familiar with their other albums because I am wondering whether you are comparing this album to their previous or you just think the songs are not good?


I have most of them, but the ones I enjoyed most were the first two, "Second Life Syndrome" and "Rapid Eye Movement". They were well crafted, much more original and fresh. The songs on the new album are just weak, also in comparison with the albums I mentioned.

Out of Myself and Second Life Syndrome you mean. The first one is just very special.



Sorry, yes... Didn't check, went by memory (big mistake!). I do like "Rapid Eye Movement" too, though.
Rodney - 11.03.2013 at 01:53  
Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 11:54

Boring, boring, boring. Inoffensive, harmless, innocuous music


I've never understood why people say this, do you really only like music that's offensive? For me most "offensive" music just comes across as contrived, as if the bands are just putting on a show. Also I don't see how the music being either offensive or unoffensive has any bearing on it's quality. Music should be judged on it's own merits not on how many people offends or how "harmful" it is.
Merchant of Doom - 11.03.2013 at 11:26  
Written by Rodney on 11.03.2013 at 01:53

Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 11:54

Boring, boring, boring. Inoffensive, harmless, innocuous music


I've never understood why people say this, do you really only like music that's offensive? For me most "offensive" music just comes across as contrived, as if the bands are just putting on a show. Also I don't see how the music being either offensive or unoffensive has any bearing on it's quality. Music should be judged on it's own merits not on how many people offends or how "harmful" it is.


No, I also like good inoffensive music.
Rodney - 11.03.2013 at 21:22  
Written by Merchant of Doom on 11.03.2013 at 11:26

Written by Rodney on 11.03.2013 at 01:53

Written by Merchant of Doom on 10.03.2013 at 11:54

Boring, boring, boring. Inoffensive, harmless, innocuous music


I've never understood why people say this, do you really only like music that's offensive? For me most "offensive" music just comes across as contrived, as if the bands are just putting on a show. Also I don't see how the music being either offensive or unoffensive has any bearing on it's quality. Music should be judged on it's own merits not on how many people offends or how "harmful" it is.


No, I also like good inoffensive music.


Fair enough haha. I've always just found it strange that people criticize music for being inoffensive.
Iron Nostarion - 22.09.2013 at 01:15  
'70s prog is actually great. It's adventurous and fun, one of my most favorite genres to ever exist. I LOVE it, not mind it, if a band goes there. To be honest I just got this album and it doesn't sound too much like '70s prog; this band is progressive however and it may very well sound similar at times with progressive rock bands (who were obviously at their pinnacle in the '70s). You guys should realize most of the progressive bands' fanbases (I can leave out some exceptions like Tool and the "GROWL FOR ME MIKAEL.. PLS" Opeth fans) actually probably enjoy them going down the "70s prog" road. There's no place for total unoriginality in '70s prog because you can't rip off a whole song as hard as you try. Thing is, progressive musicians find solace in experimentation and experimenting in the footsteps of their first influences' ways probably is a fun road for them to be taken.

Most prog fans however love a lot of music types, love hearing experimentation and love any music with a meaning. So if it may be 'inoffensive' or 'harmless' to you; get back to Cannibal Corpse (no offense intended with that to either you or the bands); because most likely the term 'progressive' won't be your cup of tea, but it is certainly not bad music. It takes a lot of knowledge and effort, requires high standards, pleases a lot of people, and certainly has meaning and substance. ^^

Advertise on Metal Storm


Login or register to post here.



Similar topics

Forum Topic Similarity Started
News Riverside - New Album Teaser Released 4.5 29.11.2012 by Unhealer
News Riverside - New Album Details 4.5 18.04.2009 by Metal_Militia
News Riverside - Reveal New Album Release Date And First 2013 Shows 4.5 09.11.2012 by R'Vannith
Events MEX, Mexico City - Riverside: New Generation American Tour 2013 4.5 20.03.2013 by Daggon
Events NED, Hengelo - Riverside: New Generation European Tour 2013 4.5 21.05.2013 by Góral



Hits total: 3763 | This month: 68