Yayla - Pas​.​to​.​rale review




Bandcamp music player
Reviewer:
8.0

16 users:
7.38
Band: Yayla
Album: Pas​.​to​.​rale
Release date: February 2017


01. Altars In Temple Sewers
02. Everyday Is Death For Us
03. Pandora
04. Funeral
05. Steadfast Chaos
06. Endless Regrets
07. Mantras Of Separation
08. Rats
09. Pastorale
10. They Are Losing You From Me


"I believe this is hell; that I will suffer even after I die… eternally". Well, after that opening line I feel like quoting the great Dax Riggs: "If this is hell, then I'm lucky".

I've been following Yayla's career ever since the sophomore album Sathimasal came out back in 2012 along with Emir's other brainchild, Blliigghhtted. I vividly remember getting lost in the fuzzy, bassy and highly entrancing black metal of Sathimasal. It displayed an odd sense of melancholia and despair, as if something more abstract and greater than the individual was in danger. Pas.to.rale on the other hand feels very human and even down-to-earth at points which reflects on the music as well. Yayla now focuses on a greater sense of melody and rhythm (as in the catchy beginning to "Mantras Of Separation") and less emphasis has been put to bass and fuzzy, disorienting riffs. These sorrowful melodies are accompanied by desperate lyrics that yours truly relates to a homesickness of sorts.

From the very beginning we are treated to raw melodic riffs that pay homage to the classic acts from the 90s while avoiding feeling too familiar. This might be because different themes revolving around black metal culture are mixed homogenously. Pas.to.rale is plagued with ritualistic instrumentals that almost take over half the running time of the album. These tracks lead the way to ghostly, slow and punishing riffs that evoke strong depressive/suicidal vibes, at times similar to Xasthur's work, that eventually erupt into more chaotic tunes producing a more "classic satanic" atmosphere related to older acts of this genre.

It's in these introductory instrumentals that plenty of experimentation can be found, "Pandora" being my personal favorite with keys that remind me of old Burzum juxtaposed with drumming that is highly erratic at times. Some of the organ-sounding keyboards are almost circus-like (both in "Pandora" and "Rats") and add further sense of confusion and uncertainty which seems to be the main theme of the album once all the changes in mood are considered.

My only gripe with this album is "They Are Losing You From Me" which to me does not work as a closer, unlike the title track with its great melodic riffs that almost made me think of Wolves In The Throne Room for a second. All in all, Pas.to.rale is a very multifaceted album that has plenty of material for everybody in love with this versatile genre, from the traditional to the experimental.

Bandcamp


Rating breakdown
Performance: 8
Songwriting: 8
Originality: 8
Production: 8


 



Written on 10.03.2017 by An extremely lazy reviewer but he's so cute you'd forgive him for it.


Comments

Comments: 8   Visited by: 108 users
10.03.2017 - 20:11
Apothecary
PsyCHEdelic
Emir has a great habit of changing the style considerably from album to album, not just with Yayla but Blliigghhtted and Viranesir as well. Very enjoyable release, it seems to only get better and leave a stronger impression with more spins.
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Written by RaduP on 14.01.2016 at 02:08

So you're not actually a bearded shaman opening his third eye through music?
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10.03.2017 - 20:13
Mr. Doctor
Skandino
Written by Apothecary on 10.03.2017 at 20:11
Very enjoyable release, it seems to only get better and leave a stronger impression with more spins.

I thought the same, definitely a grower. It started off for me by being less good than the sophomore album but after a week or two it got better. The subtle details do that.
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Written by BloodTears on 19.08.2011 at 18:29
Like you could kiss my ass
Written by Milena on 20.06.2012 at 10:49
Rod, let me love you.
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10.03.2017 - 20:21
Apothecary
PsyCHEdelic
Written by Mr. Doctor on 10.03.2017 at 20:13

I thought the same, definitely a grower. It started off for me by being less good than the sophomore album but after a week or two it got better. The subtle details do that.

That's the other thing about this dude's music I like, it can tend to trick you a lot like that. Because, at a first glance, it often is really raw and basic but there are indeed those subtle intricacies underneath it for you to sort of peel back. It's like a challenge, like... "I dare you to see what lurks beneath"
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Written by RaduP on 14.01.2016 at 02:08

So you're not actually a bearded shaman opening his third eye through music?
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10.03.2017 - 20:51
Metren
The What The?
Fantastically well-detailed review, really describes the album well. Listened to the thing today and enjoyed it immensly.
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Dreadrealm's Bandcamp with free downloads: https://dreadrealm.bandcamp.com/ (200 Free Downloads Every Month is Bandcamp's limit)
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11.03.2017 - 20:51
Susan
Smeghead
Ugh... the fuzz is so brilliantly done. You could just drink it.

You say something pretty perfect with, "pay homage to the classic acts...while avoiding feeling too familiar." This sentiment, in its myriad forms, is the goal of so many bands, and Yayla captured it just right.
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"A life all mine
Is what I choose
At the end of my days"
--The Gathering "A Life All Mine" from Souvenirs
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12.03.2017 - 00:29
no one
Account deleted
Sounds interesting and I like the cover photo... will check it out.
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12.03.2017 - 03:21
Mr. Doctor
Skandino
Written by Metren on 10.03.2017 at 20:51
Fantastically well-detailed review, really describes the album well. Listened to the thing today and enjoyed it immensly

Thank you for the kind words! I've been in a very dry period when it comes to writing reviews so it does mean a lot that I still got it somewhere in the back of my head!

Written by Susan on 11.03.2017 at 20:51

Ugh... the fuzz is so brilliantly done. You could just drink it.
You say something pretty perfect with, "pay homage to the classic acts...while avoiding feeling too familiar." This sentiment, in its myriad forms, is the goal of so many bands, and Yayla captured it just right.

Thank you Susan! The fuzz is really strong with this project, indeed. Like I said in the previous review "Soft black velvet through your ears and a bassy wall of sound that washes through your veins." It does apply here as well, although I'd say the sophomore album was fuzzier but that's probably because it lacked the instrumentals this one has. Regarding the influences, Yayla does seem to have a great balance between classic and bringing something new to the table.
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Written by BloodTears on 19.08.2011 at 18:29
Like you could kiss my ass
Written by Milena on 20.06.2012 at 10:49
Rod, let me love you.
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13.03.2017 - 02:16
no one
Account deleted
Nice change from the dissonant black metal sound that seems to be trendy lately.
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