Rating:
9.0
Megadeth - Youthanasia
24 October 1994


01. Reckoning Day
02. Train Of Consequences
03. Addicted To Chaos
04. A Tout Le Monde
05. Elysian Fields
06. The Killing Road
07. Blood Of Heroes
08. Family Tree
09. Youthanasia
10. I Thought I Knew It All
11. Black Curtains
12. Victory
13. Millenium Of The Blind [2004 re-release bonus]
14. New World Order [demo][2004 re-release bonus]
15. Absolution (Instrumental) [2004 re-release bonus]
16. A Tout Le Monde [demo][2004 re-release bonus]


Four years after the epic Rust in Peace, Megadeth, under the command of the creative Dave Mustaine, made it again. For the greatest pleasure of our impatient ears, Youthanasia has been released in 1994. After the phenomenal success of the previous disc, the very metallic Countdown to Extinction, Megadeth's fans owed to be surprised, or could have been bored in a genre in which competition was tough (Metallica, Anthrax...).
So what? Did they make it?

Well, Youthanasia, with its sumptuous melodies and its warm production has soon convinced and charmed a huge attendance, confirming Megadeth among the greatest bands of metal. Without having the creative boost and the volume of Rust in Peace, Youthanasia distinguishes itself of the previous albums by its ability to alternate very rhythmed tracks and power ballads, of which the lyrical "A tout le monde" is the best example. This is a stunning and bewitching track, introduced by arpeggios, and that has the distinctive feature to integrate very well a chorus in French. "Blood of Heroes" is played in the same way, with arpeggios to introduce it, then the rise with a merciless rhythm part. Even though the guitar solos are softer than before, the emotional force is still there. For instance, "Addicted to Chaos" is as good for its impeccable structural aspect as for the innate feeling of the four guys that make this song flowing and wonderful at the same time.

More than on any other album, the rhythm parts have the lion's share on most of the tracks. "Reckoning Day" and "Train of Consequences" particularly highlight Dave Ellefson and Nick Menza, whose drums' sound has never been that warm.

All along this album, it becomes clear that Megadeth did not lose its creative verve with the nervous "Victory" and "The Killing Road", or "Elysian Fields" and "I Thought I Knew It All", two unusual tracks but still very good. And even though "Family Tree", "Youthanasia" and "Black Curtains" are quite modest, they perfectly fit in the album without harming its unity.

Actually this is a really excellent album that shows the band has been able to renew without falling into the trap of commercial silliness. On the contrary, Megadeth has made a lyrical and technical performance without denying the qualities that have borne them until the top.


Band profile: Megadeth
Album: Youthanasia


 


written by Gorey | 22.10.2003


Guest review disclaimer:
This is a guest review, which means it does not necessarily represent the point of view of the MS Staff.



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Bitch Boy - 16.04.2007 at 06:24  
Same here, "A tout le monde" is my favorite song by far.
dismaleuphony - 16.04.2007 at 07:17  
While this disc may never be my favorite from the band, it's always a satisfying listen. "Train Of Consequences" and "Elysian Fields" were songs I remember listening to a lot when this disc was new. One of the few cds that got me through what I feel was a difficult time during my time being a metal fan in the pre-internet age.
Dangerboner - 16.04.2007 at 07:33  
This album is so radio friendly that it makes me a little nautious. It's not bad at all, but it's way too slow. I'd give it a 7 or something.
Demonmayonnaise - 19.03.2008 at 07:04  
I like this album, its not the best Megadeth, but its not the worst.
Gabo - 05.03.2009 at 02:26  
One of the best megadeth albums. You cannot compare it to the classic Countdown To Extinction or Rust In Peace, but still a excelent album. Highlights: Train of Consecuences, Addicted to Chaos, A Tout Le Monde and Blood of Heroes.
Xeros612 - 24.04.2009 at 20:21  
Aside from A Tout Le Monde, nothing else in the album really seems all that listenable. I give it a 5.
Matseb2611 - 02.09.2010 at 22:34  
Am I the only one who is blown away by 'I thought I knew it all'? That song stands at the top for me in this album, but maybe because it's pretty melodical and that's what I am into.
Metal Maiden 666 - 28.12.2010 at 16:35  
Speaking as a long time fan, I love this album. I'll put it up there with "So Far So Good So What" & "Rust In Peace". Hard for me to pick one favorite album, but this would definitely be in there. Standouts include: "Addicted to Choas", "Blood of Heroes", "Train of Consequences" & "A Tout le Monde". Megadeth has been my favorite band for 20 years & counting, I give this album a 9+!!
Vikcen - 28.12.2010 at 18:08  
Written by Metal Maiden 666 on 28.12.2010 at 16:35

Speaking as a long time fan, I love this album. I'll put it up there with "So Far So Good So What" & "Rust In Peace". Hard for me to pick one favorite album, but this would definitely be in there. Standouts include: "Addicted to Choas", "Blood of Heroes", "Train of Consequences" & "A Tout le Monde". Megadeth has been my favorite band for 20 years & counting, I give this album a 9+!!


Youthanasia is my favorite album from Megadeth...
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 19:50  
The only slight issue I have with this album is it's pacing. There's no variation, which can be a sticking point. But I have no complaints about the songs themselves. I love every single song on the album. xD
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 20:13  
I think Megadeth started to simplify their music and make their sound more accessible, trying to get more attention from the mainstream, with "Countdown To Extinction". After that, I never cared for this band.
Not that it was among my favorites before but I liked a few songs here and there.
But it was a general phenomenon in the 90s. Pretty much all 80s Thrash bands started to suck in the 90s (it was a very shitty decade for this genre). Even my all-time favorite Thrash band, Kreator, sucked donkey balls in the 90s and went back to something listenable for me only with "Violent Revolution".
In fact, I renewed with Thrash only a few years ago. I had lost all interest to check anything new from Thrash bands since the mid-90s because, Imo, anything new was sucky garbage. For a very long time, I still listened to old Thrash albums but I almost never bothered to check new albums. And the few times I took a chance and checked new material, it sucked so bad I regretted having taken the chance.

Sorry for the negativity but that's how I feel about the 90s when it comes to Thrash.
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 20:16  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:13

I think Megadeth started to simplify their music and make their sound more accessible, trying to get more attention from the mainstream, with "Countdown To Extinction". After that, I never cared for this band.


Dave was always trying to compete with Metallica and trying to "outdo" them. So its not surprising that he made Megadeth material much more accessible after the "Black Album" was released.
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 20:28  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 20:16

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:13

I think Megadeth started to simplify their music and make their sound more accessible, trying to get more attention from the mainstream, with "Countdown To Extinction". After that, I never cared for this band.


Dave was always trying to compete with Metallica and trying to "outdo" them. So its not surprising that he made Megadeth material much more accessible after the "Black Album" was released.


Indeed. I know about it for sure. You know how I hate Metallica and especially the black album for what it did to the metal scene. What you describe here is one of the perverse effects of this sellout commercial album.

But I think Dave chose the wrong way to outdo Metallica, unfortunately. Imo, he should have sticked to release uncompromising Thrash albums, fast and complex, to show people what a real great Thrash Metal band is and where the posers are. He sould have done his best to show that sales don't equal quality. It was impossible to outdo Metallica as for sales anyway but, this way, he would have gained tons of respect from the true metalheads and would have contributed to the advancement of Thrash Metal.
In other terms, I think he should have done his best to 'slay' Metallica musically and in terms of qualitative metal. Not trying to compete in terms of sales.
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 20:39  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:28
Indeed. I know about it for sure. You know how I hate Metallica and especially the black album for what it did to the metal scene. What you describe here is one of the perverse effects of this sellout commercial album.

It was impossible to outdo Metallica as for sales anyway but, this way, he would have gained tons of respect from the true metalheads and would have contributed to the advancement of Thrash Metal.


I do. hehe

The funny thing is, Dave Mustaine and Megadeth do have a lot more respect from "true metalheads" than Metallica do. I think many (more or less blind Dave/Megadeth fanboys though!) suffer from the delusion that because Megadeth failed to achieve the massive popularity and stardom that Metallica had, that Dave didn't sell out in the 90's. As much as I like some of the Megadeth material from the 90's, I think for anyone to suggest that Dave didnt sell out with those albums is in need of a reality check. Dave was jealous of Metallica's success, and was willing to compromise his artistic integrity to try and gain similar success. Even Dave himself, has stated that the mid-late 90's albums were made the way they were in order to "get the number one album Id always wanted". I think some live in some kind of cloud-cuckoo land where Dave and Megadeth are concerned, because he sold out, and that is an indisputable fact. I hate using the term "sold-out", I think it's overused, and any band who deviates from its original style is tagged with it. But in Megadeth's case, its undeniable, as Dave has admitted making albums merely to achieve commercial success and radio airplay. He may not have used the word "sold-out", but he doesn't have to.
The Shape 1973 - 28.12.2010 at 20:40  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 20:16

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:13

I think Megadeth started to simplify their music and make their sound more accessible, trying to get more attention from the mainstream, with "Countdown To Extinction". After that, I never cared for this band.


Dave was always trying to compete with Metallica and trying to "outdo" them. So its not surprising that he made Megadeth material much more accessible after the "Black Album" was released.

I really liked the Black Album, if it wasn't for that I probably wouldn't have even listened to their other stuff or any Megadeth and missed a lot. Sometimes an album hated by fans opens doors for people who wouldn't have even looked at the genre.

Even though I don't really listen to anything that could be described as thrash anymore, it still gave me the love for something more aggressive. My tastes grew to more than just Def Leppard and Magnum, the sound of a good guitar solo also came about the same time.
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 20:45  
Written by The Shape 1973 on 28.12.2010 at 20:40
I really liked the Black Album, if it wasn't for that I probably wouldn't have even listened to their other stuff or any Megadeth and missed a lot. Sometimes an album hated by fans opens doors for people who wouldn't have even looked at the genre.

Even though I don't really listen to anything that could be described as thrash anymore, it still gave me the love for something more aggressive. My tastes grew to more than just Def Leppard and Magnum, the sound of a good guitar solo also came about the same time.


I like the Black Album too. It gets a lot of stick from "true metalheads", but Ive always loved many of the songs on it.
Array - 28.12.2010 at 20:47  
Who are these "true metalheads"? i think you're talking about the people who cherish stagnation and narrow-mindedness.
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 20:53  
Written by Array on 28.12.2010 at 20:47

Who are these "true metalheads"? i think you're talking about the people who cherish stagnation and narrow-mindedness.


Are you trying to say that the black album was a form of evolution?
Damn, it was even worse than stagnation, as it was a case of musical devolution.

As for narrow-mindedness, it's a totally void argument I don't even want to discuss.
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 20:58  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 20:39

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:28
Indeed. I know about it for sure. You know how I hate Metallica and especially the black album for what it did to the metal scene. What you describe here is one of the perverse effects of this sellout commercial album.

It was impossible to outdo Metallica as for sales anyway but, this way, he would have gained tons of respect from the true metalheads and would have contributed to the advancement of Thrash Metal.


I do. hehe

The funny thing is, Dave Mustaine and Megadeth do have a lot more respect from "true metalheads" than Metallica do. I think many (more or less blind Dave/Megadeth fanboys though!) suffer from the delusion that because Megadeth failed to achieve the massive popularity and stardom that Metallica had, that Dave didn't sell out in the 90's. As much as I like some of the Megadeth material from the 90's, I think for anyone to suggest that Dave didnt sell out with those albums is in need of a reality check. Dave was jealous of Metallica's success, and was willing to compromise his artistic integrity to try and gain similar success. Even Dave himself, has stated that the mid-late 90's albums were made the way they were in order to "get the number one album Id always wanted". I think some live in some kind of cloud-cuckoo land where Dave and Megadeth are concerned, because he sold out, and that is an indisputable fact. I hate using the term "sold-out", I think it's overused, and any band who deviates from its original style is tagged with it. But in Megadeth's case, its undeniable, as Dave has admitted making albums merely to achieve commercial success and radio airplay. He may not have used the word "sold-out", but he doesn't have to.


I have more respect for Megadeth than Metallica for sure (not really hard, as I deeply despise Metallica).
But I will never say that Dave never sold out and tried to appeal to the mainstream. He did.
You're right, he's not been succesful in his attempt. As I said in my previous post, it was a futile attempt.
Array - 28.12.2010 at 21:02  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:53

Written by Array on 28.12.2010 at 20:47

Who are these "true metalheads"? i think you're talking about the people who cherish stagnation and narrow-mindedness.


Are you trying to say that the black album was a form of evolution?
Damn, it was even worse than stagnation, as it was a case of musical devolution.

As for narrow-mindedness, it's a totally void argument I don't even want to discuss.

are you trying to say evolution doesn't exist and this musical change didn't happen?
it was a different kind of an album and some people like it without thinking market sells.
basicly every release out there is meant to be bought.
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 21:06  
Written by Array on 28.12.2010 at 21:02

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:53

Written by Array on 28.12.2010 at 20:47

Who are these "true metalheads"? i think you're talking about the people who cherish stagnation and narrow-mindedness.


Are you trying to say that the black album was a form of evolution?
Damn, it was even worse than stagnation, as it was a case of musical devolution.

As for narrow-mindedness, it's a totally void argument I don't even want to discuss.

are you trying to say evolution doesn't exist and this musical change didn't happen?
it was a different kind of an album and some people like it without thinking market sells.
basicly every release out there is meant to be bought.


There's no evolution in releasing an album full of dumbed down music targeted directly at mainstream masses. The goal of this album was not to make metal evolve but to make as much money as possible.
Vikcen - 28.12.2010 at 21:11  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 20:13

I think Megadeth started to simplify their music and make their sound more accessible, trying to get more attention from the mainstream, with "Countdown To Extinction". After that, I never cared for this band.
Not that it was among my favorites before but I liked a few songs here and there.
But it was a general phenomenon in the 90s. Pretty much all 80s Thrash bands started to suck in the 90s (it was a very shitty decade for this genre). Even my all-time favorite Thrash band, Kreator, sucked donkey balls in the 90s and went back to something listenable for me only with "Violent Revolution".
In fact, I renewed with Thrash only a few years ago. I had lost all interest to check anything new from Thrash bands since the mid-90s because, Imo, anything new was sucky garbage. For a very long time, I still listened to old Thrash albums but I almost never bothered to check new albums. And the few times I took a chance and checked new material, it sucked so bad I regretted having taken the chance.

Sorry for the negativity but that's how I feel about the 90s when it comes to Thrash.


Well, i agree with you that it is more accesible, and indeed it is not a thrash metal album, it is heavy metal, after "Rust In Peace" Megadeth begins the heavy metal era in the 90s. And when you say "simplify their music" if you refer to technical level, yes i can agree with you, this album (Youthanasia) is less complex, but if you refer to the music composition or creative songwriting/melody, etc... this is more relative.

About Thrash in the 90s, maybe i feel the same that you. But well, some thrash albums from 90s here:

- The Sound Of Perseverance by Death
- Rust In Peace by Megadeth
- Vulgar Display Of Power by Pantera
- Arise by Sepultura
- Chaos A.D. by Sepultura
- Seasons In The Abyss by Slayer
- Soziedad Alkoholika by Soziedad Alkoholika
- Low by Testament
- The Gathering by Testament
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 21:21  
Hun, "The Sound Of Perseverance" is a melodic death metal album, not thrash. "Chaos AD" is not thrash either, and Pantera were never really thrash, although they did have thrash elements in their sound.

You also missed out "Persistance Of Time" and "Coma Of Souls". (both of which were released in 1990)
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 21:23  
@Vikcen: Yes, by "simplify their music", I refer to technical level.
Vikcen - 28.12.2010 at 21:39  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 21:21

Hun, "The Sound Of Perseverance" is a melodic death metal album, not thrash. "Chaos AD" is not thrash either, and Pantera were never really thrash, although they did have thrash elements in their sound.

You also missed out "Persistance Of Time" and "Coma Of Souls". (both of which were released in 1990)


hehe, and "The Gathering" is Death Metal =)
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 21:41  
Written by Vikcen on 28.12.2010 at 21:39
hehe, and "The Gathering" is Death Metal =)


"The Gathering" has death metal elements, but I wouldnt really call it death metal. Its like a mix of their earlier melodic thrash style, mixed in with death metal and more modern metal elements.
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 21:44  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 21:21

Hun, "The Sound Of Perseverance" is a melodic death metal album, not thrash. "Chaos AD" is not thrash either, and Pantera were never really thrash, although they did have thrash elements in their sound.

You also missed out "Persistance Of Time" and "Coma Of Souls". (both of which were released in 1990)


I was about to point out the same.

As for Thrash albums, a few good ones were released in the 90s but all the ones you and Vikcen mentioned were from the very early 90s. Around 92-93, pretty much all bands started to suck and that's when it became almost impossible to find a good Thrash album in the 90s. The very early years were not as awful as what came after.

EDIT: Some people say Thrash died as soon as 1990 pointed its ugly head. It's not exactly what happened. In fact, it was a bit more progressive than that. It started to not bode well at all around 1990/1991 and declined quickly until it was pretty much dead around 1992-1993, perhaps 1994.
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 21:50  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 21:44
I was about to point out the same.

As for Thrash albums, a few good ones were released in the 90s but all the ones you and Vikcen mentioned were from the very early 90s. Around 92-93, pretty much all bands started to suck and that's when it became almost impossible to find a good Thrash album in the 90s. The very early years were not as awful as what came after.


I actually see 1990 as part of the 80's, as far as I see it as the last year that really classic thrash albums were released. Albums like "Coma Of Souls", "Rust In Peace", and "Persistance Of Time" for example, have far more in common with those bands 80's albums, than anything that followed in the 90's. So as far as the classic thrash period is concerned, I see 1990 as more part of the 80's, than the 90's.

Edit: Haha, in your edit, you've pretty much said what I just have! xD
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 21:54  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 21:50

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 21:44
I was about to point out the same.

As for Thrash albums, a few good ones were released in the 90s but all the ones you and Vikcen mentioned were from the very early 90s. Around 92-93, pretty much all bands started to suck and that's when it became almost impossible to find a good Thrash album in the 90s. The very early years were not as awful as what came after.


I actually see 1990 as part of the 80's, as far as I see it as the last year that really classic thrash albums were released. Albums like "Coma Of Souls", "Rust In Peace", and "Persistance Of Time" for example, have far more in common with those bands 80's albums, than anything that followed in the 90's. So as far as the classic thrash period is concerned, I see 1990 as more part of the 80's, than the 90's.


That's exactly what I think too. I include 1990 as part of the 80s, when it comes to Thrash and traditional Heavy Metal, even it it's technically inaccurate. Though it depends on how you look at it.
Because, if you think about it, albums released in 1990 were in fact composed, recorded and produced in the 80s.
Vikcen - 28.12.2010 at 22:01  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 21:41

Written by Vikcen on 28.12.2010 at 21:39
hehe, and "The Gathering" is Death Metal =)


"The Gathering" has death metal elements, but I wouldnt really call it death metal. Its like a mix of their earlier melodic thrash style, mixed in with death metal and more modern metal elements.


Well, you know, this is the problem to classify the albums in genres lol
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 22:06  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 21:54
Because, if you think about it, albums released in 1990 were in fact composed, recorded and produced in the 80s.


That's actually a very good point.

I mean, all of these bands recorded a real thrash album in 1990. (Anthrax, Megadeth, Sepultura, Kreator, Overkill, Testament, Forbidden, Exodus, and others) By the time of all of these bands' next albums, they had either watered down the thrash, or abandoned it altogether. So to me, its quite easy to see 1990 as like the end of the classic thrash period, even if it's technically not part of the 80's.

Edit: Oops, Ive just remembered that Sepultura's "Arise" was released in 1991. lol *blushing*
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 22:20  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 22:06

I mean, all of these bands recorded a real thrash album in 1990. (Anthrax, Megadeth, Sepultura, Kreator, Overkill, Testament, Forbidden, Exodus, and others) By the time of all of these bands' next albums, they had either watered down the thrash, or abandoned it altogether. So to me, its quite easy to see 1990 as like the end of the classic thrash period, even if it's technically not part of the 80's.


Yeah, a few years after that, nearly all Thrash bands either:
1) started to suck
2) disappeared in limbo or officially called a quit

The quick decline Thrash and traditional Heavy Metal both suffered in the early 90s is one thing I will never be able to understand and explain. I mean, it was quite sudden and so fast.

The young fans will perhaps have some difficulty to imagine it but, to tell you the extent of the changes the metal scene undergone back then, I can tell you that it was nearly impossible to find someone who still cared for Iron Maiden here at that time. People simply didn't give a fuck any longer at Thrash and Heavy Metal. It was all about Death, industrial, groove, alternative, grunge, etc, etc.. But the classic metal genres? Dead. And almost no one cared.

I don't know if it was the same in Europe. I should ask Marcel about it. He surely remembers.
Angelic Storm - 28.12.2010 at 22:31  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 22:20

The quick decline Thrash and traditional Heavy Metal both suffered in the early 90s is one thing I will never be able to understand and explain. I mean, it was quite sudden and so fast.

The young fans will perhaps have some difficulty to imagine it but, to tell you the extent of the changes the metal scene undergone back then, I can tell you that it was nearly impossible to find someone who still cared for Iron Maiden here at that time. People simply didn't give a fuck any longer at Thrash and Heavy Metal. It was all about Death, industrial, groove, alternative, grunge, etc, etc.. But the classic metal genres? Dead. And almost no one cared.

I don't know if it was the same in Europe. I should ask Marcel about it. He surely remembers.


Hehe, I am just old enough to remember that. It was the same in Europe. Or at least it was in the UK. I even remember Kerrang having a headline that said "thrash is dead?" in one of their articles that featured Overkill and Testament.
Vikcen - 28.12.2010 at 22:35  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 22:20


I don't know if it was the same in Europe. I should ask Marcel about it. He surely remembers.


In my oppinion, was the same, by that time about metal the United States had great influence in Europe, in my opinion, at least here in Spain.

But, Metal music could not stay in the classic, this had to evolve somehow, in my opinion for me was not a bad thing.
RavenKing - 28.12.2010 at 23:45  
Thanks for the replies, Angelic Storm and Vikcen. So, it looks as the situation in the 90s was kinda similar in Europe.

You know, it's one of those instances where I believe a little revisionism doesn't hurt. It helps to dissipate the false rumors and preconceptions carried on in the metal community.

Some people (mostly young ones who weren't there and can't possibly remember) have an idyllic view of some 80s metal bands. They believe that they were always considered as gods and immensely popular, and it is so far from the truth at times.
I remember a time when people didn't admit they liked Helloween by fear of being mocked and when people considered Iron Maiden, Kreator, Testament, etc as dead and buried and when Blind Guardian played in front of 300-400 people.

I don't want to undermine the credit lots of old bands deserve. I only wish to express how some people believe in an utopia when it comes to this matter.
PhantomLord21 - 03.08.2011 at 21:10  
Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 22:20

The quick decline Thrash and traditional Heavy Metal both suffered in the early 90s is one thing I will never be able to understand and explain. I mean, it was quite sudden and so fast.


Apparently, it was due to the rise of Grunge (you know, bands like Nirvana) in the early 90's that Metal suffered the way it did.
Marcel Hubregtse - 03.08.2011 at 21:49  
Written by PhantomLord21 on 03.08.2011 at 21:10

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 22:20

The quick decline Thrash and traditional Heavy Metal both suffered in the early 90s is one thing I will never be able to understand and explain. I mean, it was quite sudden and so fast.


Apparently, it was due to the rise of Grunge (you know, bands like Nirvana) in the early 90's that Metal suffered the way it did.


Grunge killed of glam at most, that's it.

don't believe what people say about Grunge's effect on thrash. Ffs when grunge came to a fore death metal bloomed. One might as well state death metal killed off thrash, which is more true tbh, than grunge.

It is clear you weren't around at the time or else you wouldn't be saying what the popular music press is currwntly saying.

Grunge didn't have too mich of an effect on real metal.
Haiwaan Das - 19.01.2012 at 05:21  
Written by Angelic Storm on 28.12.2010 at 22:31

Written by RavenKing on 28.12.2010 at 22:20

The quick decline Thrash and traditional Heavy Metal both suffered in the early 90s is one thing I will never be able to understand and explain. I mean, it was quite sudden and so fast.

The young fans will perhaps have some difficulty to imagine it but, to tell you the extent of the changes the metal scene undergone back then, I can tell you that it was nearly impossible to find someone who still cared for Iron Maiden here at that time. People simply didn't give a fuck any longer at Thrash and Heavy Metal. It was all about Death, industrial, groove, alternative, grunge, etc, etc.. But the classic metal genres? Dead. And almost no one cared.

I don't know if it was the same in Europe. I should ask Marcel about it. He surely remembers.


Hehe, I am just old enough to remember that. It was the same in Europe. Or at least it was in the UK. I even remember Kerrang having a headline that said "thrash is dead?" in one of their articles that featured Overkill and Testament.


But the scene really started in exact that time here in Asia. We actually started getting Metal Records in our Music Stores from 90s only so in a way its good because when it died in your area it started in our area and when u guys were inactive with real metal we guys were listening to some of the great Metal Releases.
jukebox1480 - 07.03.2012 at 04:12  
Im probably alone on this,but I think this is the most underrated metal albums of all time. If it had came out four years earlier then it did,I think it would of been huge. Youthanasia has great riffs and while it may not be the thrash of earlier Megadeth,it is just as good. One of my favorite albums from my teenage years.
Vikcen - 03.04.2012 at 02:56  
Written by jukebox1480 on 07.03.2012 at 04:12

Youthanasia has great riffs and while it may not be the thrash of earlier Megadeth,it is just as good. One of my favorite albums from my teenage years.


I would have said exactly the same =)
John Shock - 02.07.2012 at 19:01  
Written by jukebox1480 on 07.03.2012 at 04:12

Im probably alone on this,but I think this is the most underrated metal albums of all time. If it had came out four years earlier then it did,I think it would of been huge. Youthanasia has great riffs and while it may not be the thrash of earlier Megadeth,it is just as good. One of my favorite albums from my teenage years.

No friend, you're not alone...this is really a underrated one! And yes, it has some amazing riffs on this one! Specially Train Of Consequences on the intro riff, i simply love it! ...
Marcel Hubregtse - 02.07.2012 at 19:08  
UNderrated? It sold like hot cakes back then and is one of Megadeth's sell out albums where Dave tried to emulate Metallica's success with Metallica.

And to be honest both Youthanasia and COuntdown To Extinction are pretty weak albums
BitterCOld - 07.07.2012 at 00:36  
Written by Marcel Hubregtse on 02.07.2012 at 19:08

And to be honest both Youthanasia and COuntdown To Extinction are pretty weak albums


please do not employ my syntax schtick when referencing that weak album. thank you.

and yes, those albums were so weak i haven't bought a Megadeth album since. Countdown was a greater disappointment coming off the heels of RIP than the Black Album was off ...AFJA... the only reason I even got Youthanasia was because I joined one of those CD clubs and needed a 12th album for my "get a dozen albums for a penny."

i still find it hilarious how much of a pass MegadavE was given for his post-RIP output.

i guess it's because he "righted the ship" after his sell out was less a success and started putting out more aggressive albums again before most our users stumbled in to metal.

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