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Getting Into: Negură Bunget (1995-2010)


Written by: RaduP
Published: 21.11.2021


When I started writing Getting Into articles, I started writing for some of my favorite bands which were missing one, each of them being bands with enormous significance to me in developing my taste in my formative years. Some of those I also discovered thanks to Metal Storm. But Negură Bunget has an additional reason to be very very significant for me. They’re from my country. Well, not only that, they’re from the city where I went to college, and their music is themed around the landscapes and traditions of the region of the country that I live in. Needless to say, Negură Bunget is an extremely personal band for me. Even before I started writing my first article, I knew I would eventually write one for Negură Bunget. It was just a matter of building courage and finding the right time. And what a better time than for it to coincide with the band’s final album.





Negură Bunget’s history is pretty divisive in its lineup changes. Initially formed as Wiccan Rede in 1994 before morphing into Negură Bunget as a duo of Negru and Huppogramos. Sol Faur then joined the ranks in 1998 to create the “classic” trio that would release the “classic” albums. This lineup would dissolve in 2009 and Huppogramos and Sol Faur would go on to form Dordeduh, while Negru would recruit a new lineup to continue the Negură Bunget name. That lineup would implode a bunch of times too, but would reach a pretty stable form in 2013. Negru would embark on creating a “Transylvanian Trilogy” and release two of those with said lineup before passing away in 2017. The remaining lineup recorded the final album in the trilogy based on demos left over.

It’s easy to see why a band whose only founding member left being its drummer would stir up some controversy, and the lukewarm reception of the post-2009 albums might not have to do simply with “this is not the real Negură Bunget”. But it would be wrong to dismiss any part of the band’s discography, nor the post-break-up ones, nor the early Scandinavian scene worship ones. So, here I would attempt to go through the entire collected works, from the beginnings as Wiccan Rede, to the swansong Zău. And in the meantime touch on side-projects, bands spawned from it, bands of prominent members, and so on. But with varying degrees of depth, thus some of them might only have one album featured.

Picking a splitting point for the articles was a bit tough. The breakup happened in 2009, but there were two records with the original lineup released after that, even if both continuation bands released material in 2010. Picking either 2009 or 2011 would ruin the balance of number of write-ups in each article, so I went with 2010. That leaves post-breakup material in the first article, and pre-breakup material in the second article. It is what it is.

And before we embark, Negură Bunget means “dark foggy forest” and the two words come from the thracian substrate of the Romanian language, the oldest one. Most of their lyrics are in an archaic form of the language, often hard even for me to properly translate. But all of it written in the Latin alphabet, completed with a few Romanian specific characters like “ă”, “î”, “ș”, and “ț”. You’ll find a bunch of cases where information online does not have those characters properly in place, and don’t even get me started on what a mess their Spotify is. Wrong release dates, missing characters, typos, and even cases where there are some special characters, but not others. Ugh.

In any case, let us embark!





1995 - Wiccan Rede - From Transilvanian Forest


Negură Bunget didn’t actually start out as Negură Bunget, and in their primordial phase they were formed under the name Wiccan Rede back around 1994. You can easily tell from the pseudonyms that these guys took (“Black Pharmakeya Pepóromenée” for example) that they were going for that evil esoteric vampyric vibe. Granted, at least they would be one of the first bands to go for a Transylvanian vibe while actually being from Transylvania, so there is some historical merit to this record other than this being a proto-Negură Bunget. But I doubt this would get any amount of attention today if this didn’t have the same two musicians who would go on to record OM ten years later. Here Negru and Hupogrammos are joined by Aiwazz Vallach Disciple on keyboards, who either stopped making music after Wiccan Rede morphed into Negură Bunget or completely abandoned the pseudonym. This is a pretty straight-forward symphonic black metal release that does contain some pretty cool riffs, melodies, and shrieks, but in a form so undercooked and primitive and lacking something to set it apart in any positive way from the Norwegian scene it is clearly trying to emulate. This did get remastered and re-released in 2000, along with two new rehearsal tracks recorded with a different lineup, and the remaster does make this sound more worthwhile, even if I reckon some would prefer the rawness of the original. And ironically the remastered tracks sound better than the rehearsal tracks recorded much later. This would eventually bear the Negură Bunget name in a 2008 re-release, which is probably the version that you’re gonna find.




1996 - Negură Bunget - Zîrnindu-să


With the band changing its name from Wiccan Rede to Negură Bunget and Aiwazz’ departure, Negură Bunget was down to two members: Negru doing drums and Hupogrammos doing everything else. This also came with the ditching of the vampyric themes for something more inspired by Transylvania’s nature, a theme that would be consistently present in Negură Bunget’s music, and thus their music would try to channel a certain atmosphere. The symphonic aspect of the debut is shifted slightly, and while keyboards are still being used quite heavily, it’s not quite to the level of omnipresence. The biggest qualm is that the keyboard melodies are mixed significantly higher and they’re not specifically interesting, at least not compared to the guitar and drum playing, which have clearly improved in the meantime. Some clean vocals do make their debut, but they’re such an awkward far cry to how well they would be used later on. The music is still clearly trying to play catch up with the Scandinavian scene, but there’s some slight progressive tendencies in some of the melodies that begin to set the band apart. As a whole the album sounds rushed and formulaic, but presents some more potential. And the remixed version that came in 2004 tackled a bit of the mixing issues with the keyboards, and most of the time the two versions come together, so one can be free to compare.




1997 - Makrothumia - The Rit Of Individualization


Makrothumia could seem like a Negură Bunget side-project, since both Gabriel Mafa and Edmond Karban were in the band, but Makrothumia is just as old and the two bands existed concurrently in the 90s. The two are joined by three other musicians, one of which being Gabriel Karban, Edmond’s brother, who would also perform live keys and bass for both Negură Bunget and Dordeduh. Progressive doom metal is a pretty underrated genre fusion, especially if the doom metal component is closer to death doom. And even though there were some bands like Pan.thy.monium, Madder Mortem, Babylon Sad, and Phlebotomized doing something along that genre fusion at that time, Makrothumia’s The Rit Of Individualization still feels pretty unique. Though 1995’s Four Stories About… Nothing demo was notable for the presence of the violin, that one was still mostly focused on a pretty gothic take on death doom. It was The Rit Of Individualization where the songwriting took an even more progressive route. If you asked me in 1997 which band out of the two would make it big, I wouldn’t understand your question, because I was just born, but otherwise, it would probably have been this one. Though the production is as raw as you can expect, the songwriting and performances are great all around. The band was revived with a new lineup in 2013, had a couple of concerts (one of which I attended), before changing the name to Transceatla. Sadly, as of the writing of this article, the band has not released any music under that name.




1998 - Negură Bunget - Sala Molksa


“Sala Molksa is the place where Dacian knights went after death, the heaven of mighty and brave warriors.” In some ways this is a pretty watershed release. It is the first one to see Negură Bunget in its classic trio lineup, with Sol Faur joining the band, sharing Hupogrammos’ guitarly duties. But also it is the first Negură Bunget release to include some folk sensibilities, mostly in the form of some wind instruments. Though the latter is only a small change that would act more like a seed towards their development on later albums, the former shapes Sala Molksa into a more riveting release. The keyboards are used even more sparingly, with the bulk of the album concentrating more on a flurry of guitar riffs and blasts. The playing does feel a bit more sloppy because it feels like the band bit a bit more than they could chew at this point, but they were clearly willing to not live in the shadows of the Scandinavian scene any more. This is the sound of an ambitious band, but one that isn’t yet able to tackle its sound. But the choirs, complex structures, atmospheric emphasis, they’re all there, but in a form more feral. Though it is only an EP, its 27 minutes runtime makes it feel pretty complete. Like most early Negură Bunget work, it would eventually be re-released with a remixed version alongside.




2000 - Negură Bunget - Măiastru Sfetnic


Though Sala Molka debuted the classic lineup, the folk tendencies, and had a bunch of moments that feel like classic Negură Bunget, Măiastru Sfetnic pushes even further into dark atmospheres. Less feral than the previous EP, but still as feral, while continuing to develop its own unique sound. There are still bits that feel a bit awkward, which is mostly emphasized by the mixing which makes the keyboards overly loud and the vocals feel more like part of the ambiance, and the blasting sounds pretty weird as well. But there’s plenty of moments that feel enhanced by the raw production to add a feral charm. Since the band’s aim was to recreate the feeling of a dark foggy forest, I’d say it captures that atmosphere pretty well. The ambiance created can often go into spooky detours, which could have sounded incredibly cheesy in the wrong hands. Most of the songs are around ten minutes in runtime, but the band is already capable of filling that runtime with pace changes, a huge sense of dark atmosphere, integrating their past symphonic black metal tendencies with the harsher sounds and some folk embellishments. And the few clean vocal moments no longer sound awkward. Their ambition hasn’t paid off yet, but at this point it was already clear that Negură Bunget really had something to offer. Hence why while most early Negură Bunget work was remixed, this one was re-recorded completely for 2010’s Măiastrit, because the songs were too good to dwell in this state.




2002 - Negură Bunget - ‘n Crugu Bradului


Up until this point, I’ve talked about how every release was building towards the Negură Bunget sound bit by bit. Well, this one is it. No longer plagued by being too ambitious for its own good nor by amateurish production choices, ‘n Crugu Bradului takes Măiastru Sfetnic’s knack for long complex songs, and dark atmospheres and turns it to 11. Themed around the universal cyclic nature of the number 4, the album is separated in four long tracks. It still feels pretty impenetrable at first, with the songs seeming too long and incohesively sequenced, but the production and the shorter runtime makes this one easier to turn into a grower as much as it requires patience for it. To the point where my contrarian ass once considered this better than OM. Even if the folk aspects are a bit more prominent, they still take a backseat to the ferocious atmosphere and the spooky keys. So it is an improvement in pretty much every field compared to its predecessor, with the progressive and atonal songwriting being both more fit for the long-form songs, more clearly audible, and better performed. Thus, their ambition has paid off. But ‘n Crugu Bradului lacks something to make it truly monumental, and I can see where the “disjointed” criticism comes from. And yet, every time I listen to it, I love it a bit more.




2005 - Negură Bunget - Inarborat Kosmos


There are two things that are worth noting about this EP. First, this is sort of an early version of OM, at least partly. So in case you’re listening to this after listening to OM, a bunch of parts will already feel familiar, even if they would be expanded into something better later on. But in the state that they are, they’re clearly already very good. This one got included as a bonus disc on OM’s 10th anniversary re-release too. Secondly, it is incredibly weird to hear Negură Bunget singing in English. Inarborat Kosmos is composed of four tracks, two metal ones, and two ambient ones, each intertwined, creating a very fulfilling dynamic despite the relatively short 20 minutes runtime. Though it is sort of an OM teaser, it would be wrong to dismiss Inarborat Kosmos, not only because there’s original material here, but because it’s a neatly packaged bit of what makes Negură Bunget great.




2006 - Negură Bunget - OM


If you read our old rating abuse guide, you’ll notice the following: “Metal Storm has a set ranking system. A nice, easy ten digit scale. 1 is Lulu. 6 is average. 7 is good. 9 is excellent. 10 is OM, etc.”, and even though I encourage you to follow that ranking system, I find it really telling how OM can be seen as a staple of what a 10/10 metal album is. Trying to describe what makes OM such a monumental achievement is a daunting task, because it’s so hard to do it justice, especially since I don’t want its write-up to be that significantly longer than anything else. But also because, as a Romanian, this is the reason why Romanian metal even gets brought up in discussion in outside circles instead of being our own national circlejerk. Though I still think it’s only the second best Romanian album, there hasn’t really been anything close to being as revelatory. Though the secret to both bands was progressive songwriting in a newer genre combined with a dash of originality through the infusion of Romanian folk music. The folk influences have been part of Negură Bunget’s music for a while, but they get a massive contribution here, partly because Alin Drimuș of Marțolea is also contributing with some folk instruments. The production makes the music less ferocious, but more ethereal, with the progressive songwriting even more pronounced. The bass, performed by live bassist Ermit, feels even more punchy than it did on 'n Crugu Bradului. The clean vocals finally lose all traces of awkwardness, and there’s no better testament to the percussive abilities of Negru than the cinematic instrumental “Norilor”. What has previously sounded spooky now sounds downright ominous. The guitar melodies in “Ţesarul de lumini” are absolutely otherworldly, and that’s probably my favorite song of theirs. This is an album that is on such a high scale that it's hard to put into words without me blabbing incomprehensive praise. There’s no metaphor that even comes close to how this makes me feel.




2010 - Negură Bunget - Măiestrit


Re-recorded albums are very rarely that well received. Especially in black metal, where you have Dimmu Borgir and Gorgoroth attempts that are pretty lukewarm. To my knowledge, Măiestrit, is probably the only case of a black metal re-recording that I feel improves the original, and even here I’m not completely certain. This is the last release made by the original lineup, released while the band had already broken apart, so something tells me that the production would’ve been handled with even more care if the band was fully around to oversee it. For two albums of pretty much the same songs, Măiastru Sfetnic and Măiestrit still manage to sound pretty distinct, with some of the music being re-imagined rather than merely re-recorded, so in a way this re-recording completents rather than replaces the original. The production is obviously more clear, making the music feel less feral but more meaty. The mood feels more in line with a certain elegance of the previous Negură Bunget material, just with a more black metal and less folk feel. The therimin in “În-Zvîcnirea Apusului” and the clean vocal intro turning to shrieks of “Al Locului” feel even more potent. The runtime of the songs feels even more justified this time around, and that even goes for the two acoustic versions of songs, which do remind me a lot of what would eventually happen in Sunset In The 12th House.




2010 - Negură Bunget - Vîrstele Pămîntului


Negură Bunget’s original trio lineup dissolved in 2009, with Hupogrammos and Sol Faur leaving to form Dordeduh, while Negru kept Negură Bunget active recruiting some of the live musicians, as well as some new musicians. Inia Dinia and Ageru Pământului, both of Argus Megere, were already live members from as far back as 2003, while Gădineț was part of Negru’s Din Brad side project. Joining these two are Corb and Spin. For a lot of people, this and the following incarnations of the band are no longer really Negură Bunget, only having one original member in their ranks, which is a sentiment I can understand, but the post-breakup material should not be dismissed. The music on Vîrstele Pămîntului clearly tries to reconstruct the success OM, with the folk and ambient parts having a massive share of the sound, perhaps even more so. The transition from one lineup to the next in terms of the sound seems pretty smooth in terms of those sections especially. It is the more black metal bits that feel more different, especially because both vocalists on this record (Spin and Ageru) offer their first recorded contributions to the band, so the difference is starker than the folk/keys parts, especially in the clean vocals sections. And in between the two comes the riffing, which is also distinct, not necessarily in a bad way. The build up in “Pămînt” as it gets darker and darker until exploding into black metal, the massive tulnic intros of “Țara de dincolo de negură” and “Întoarcerea amurgului”, and the dark new age ambiance of “Jar”, all of these instantly became highlights, even when compared to the band’s classic material. However I can’t shake the feeling that the band were trying, even as successfully as it sounds here, to reverse engineer what really worked with OM.




2010 - Marțolea - Noaptea Dihăniilor


A band with a marginal connection to Negură Bunget is Marțolea, who is the one man band of one Alin Drimus. Alin is mostly a wizard of the folk wind instruments, having performed various flutes and the like on Negură Bunget’s OM, as well as during live performances, and on Dordeduh’s Dar De Duh. So in a way, his playing is integral in what makes OM such a masterpiece, and Noaptea Dihăniilor is mostly centered around them. He is handling every other instrument, and even though it is clear what he excels at, the guitar playing and the vocals are more than decent enough to showcase his own take on the folk black metal sound. Both his and Negură Bunget’s takes are transcendental, but whereas Negură Bunget feels like an ethereal foggy forest, Marțolea is about the creatures of the night, of strigoi and varcolaci, of things very weary of trespassers. Noaptea Dihăniilor has a very unique vibe that makes up for the relatively bland songwriting. This was preceded by the shorter Gâlmele Întunericului demo, and the two actually flow quite well one into another, so one could listen to the two in sequence as if it were one big hour-long album. I’d be more critical of the repetitive nature of this if this wasn’t this unique. And it’s not unique just because no other band sounds like this, but also because there’s no other Marțolea album to compare.




2010 - Dordeduh - Valea Omului


After the dissolution of Negură Bunget’s original lineup in 2009, Huppogramos and Sol Faur went on to form Dordeduh, and in the same year that Negură Bunget’s new lineup released Vîrstele Pămîntului, Dordeduh also wasted no time in giving us a sample of where they would take the sound next. Joined by Flavius Misarăș on bass and Sergio Ponti on drums, the sound they would forge here is a continuation of the OM sound, with a huge emphasis on folk instrumentation and ambiance, yet already sowing the seeds of an even more progressive approach. That would become even more apparent when the band would cover Enslaved’s “Ruun” for a tribute album, and that cover would be appended to this EP in later versions. The two songs here would eventually find their way in an even more expanded form on the band’s debut full-length, with “Zuh” especially growing from 6 to 14 minutes, thus the final version of “Zuh” would be longer than this entire EP. This should tell you that Valea Omului feels more like a teaser, and I can expect people in 2010 were properly teased. But once you’ve heard the final versions of these songs, Valea Omului is more of a curiosity, a fantastic EP of early versions. Though at this point it wasn’t clear who would emerge as the most successful of OM’s continuations, I’d say this EP tipped the scales slightly in Dordeduh’s favor.




And here is where we left of, after a messy break-up that spawned a completely new lineup for the band, and an offshoot in Dordeduh. This article does spawn a bigger timespan, and a massive evolution in sound, compared to what will follow in Part II, but stick around for that.






Written on 21.11.2021 by Doesn't matter that much to me if you agree with me, as long as you checked the album out.


Comments

Comments: 28   Visited by: 97 users
21.11.2021 - 17:27
Dinruth

Great read! As I mentioned in your review for Zau, I prefer Vîrstele Pămîntului over Om, but other than that I agree with your assesments for the main NB discography (except for the first two records about which I cannot say anything since I am not familiar with them) .. Have to check out Martolea and Makrothumia, because I was not aware of these projects .. so thanks for that too .. mulţumesc
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21.11.2021 - 18:05
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
Written by Dinruth on 21.11.2021 at 17:27

Great read! As I mentioned in your review for Zau, I prefer Vîrstele Pămîntului over Om, but other than that I agree with your assesments for the main NB discography (except for the first two records about which I cannot say anything since I am not familiar with them) .. Have to check out Martolea and Makrothumia, because I was not aware of these projects .. so thanks for that too .. mulţumesc

I can see why you would prefer one over the other. If you're more into folk than black metal, their pre-OM releases are gonna be increasingly unappealing the further back you go.

I'm sure you'll like Marțolea, probably more than Makrothumia.
----
Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


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21.11.2021 - 18:09
Dinruth

I wouldn't say that I am more into Folk Metal than BM .. just checked and my collection has three times more BM records than folk .. but the folk vibes in Negura Bunget have always intrigued me more than the BM
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21.11.2021 - 18:29
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
And for a piece of history:



With performances from Wiccan Rede, Makrothumia and Grimegod among others.
----
Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


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21.11.2021 - 20:07
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Maybe your best article whit some deeper meaning...read it when you reach my age and re listen whole bands disco. I like this band, like I told whit out it Romanian metal would be Cargo from touring Tinisora to Constanca , what came after this band, made metal bigger, but whit out NB ... never would happen in such level
----
Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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21.11.2021 - 20:47
Karlabos
Meat and Potatos
Sala Molska was the first Negura Bunget record I've listened to. At the time Om hadn't been released yet and the other records were pretty much short EPs so that was like their main thing

I know ppl recognize this band for its proggy black nowadays, but I that murky little record still comes to my mind whenever I hear this name
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Rose is red, violet is blue. Flag is win, Baba is you.
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21.11.2021 - 20:55
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Written by Karlabos on 21.11.2021 at 20:47

Sala Molska was the first Negura Bunget record I've listened to. At the time Om hadn't been released yet and the other records were pretty much short EPs so that was like their main thing

I know ppl recognize this band for its proggy black nowadays, but I that murky little record still comes to my mind whenever I hear this name


I get into from video Vazduk , I remember OM was discussed in old ms, old sboutbox, then in those days it was way to folky to me, now I see and listen such music whit different aspect as then.
----
Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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21.11.2021 - 21:48
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
Here's some other ones that Negură Bunget performed at back in the day. Timestamps in description:


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Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


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21.11.2021 - 22:01
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
Written by Bad English on 21.11.2021 at 20:07

Maybe your best article whit some deeper meaning...read it when you reach my age and re listen whole bands disco. I like this band, like I told whit out it Romanian metal would be Cargo from touring Tinisora to Constanca , what came after this band, made metal bigger, but whit out NB ... never would happen in such level

There was sort of a metal explosion in Romania around 95, so you already a bunch of extreme metal bands putting out demos at that time. Some of them broke up before 2000, some of them are still active. None of them made it half as big as Negură Bunget. So it's possible that without them, most of the scene would indeed just be Cargo endlessly touring the same 20 songs.

Take this with a grain of salt, but I think this is the first extreme metal album in Romania.
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Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


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21.11.2021 - 22:30
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Written by RaduP on 21.11.2021 at 22:01

Written by Bad English on 21.11.2021 at 20:07

Maybe your best article whit some deeper meaning...read it when you reach my age and re listen whole bands disco. I like this band, like I told whit out it Romanian metal would be Cargo from touring Tinisora to Constanca , what came after this band, made metal bigger, but whit out NB ... never would happen in such level

There was sort of a metal explosion in Romania around 95, so you already a bunch of extreme metal bands putting out demos at that time. Some of them broke up before 2000, some of them are still active. None of them made it half as big as Negură Bunget. So it's possible that without them, most of the scene would indeed just be Cargo endlessly touring the same 20 songs.

Take this with a grain of salt, but I think this is the first extreme metal album in Romania.

I can locate in map Bucurest, Timisor, Constanta. I can say Buna Sara and pesha. I have seen some Staua and Dinamo games, I have seen cool goals from George Haggi. But this band make romanian name on map. Sane as skyforger latvian.
That explosion was in whole Europe, but in east block it was first generation of youth what had real freedom, no more Causesku and communism. Sad in East block many good bands died. But after 2010 new rises and internet makes it happen.
All Romanian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Polish Kat, Czech arakain, citron, vuracit, doga singer did Paula Wild, but they just sing same songs and never play around.
Negura did make metal bigger there. All bands you mentioned in a review never would make it whit out Negura
----
Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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22.11.2021 - 00:33
nikarg
Mod
Superb stuff, man, well done. Love the intro and the write-ups.

OM
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22.11.2021 - 16:11
Alakazam
yolo grindset
Good to hear your/any commentary for Inarborat Kosmos these days. That thing (gosh I wish it went for longer, the ending, that is how to cadence best), Negura Bunget's style and folk black became the progenitor for psych bm.

It took me a similar set of directions on the first couple sentences about my introduction, transition to love with OM. It flows perfectly. Are you sure this boomer prog album can match up to OM or are you being a little bit too sincere? Deeply rooted different perspective, I get it, I'll have to visit it and Marțolea so thank you for sharing as always.

If Dimmu Borgir and Gorgoroth's re-recordings were lukewarm, would that mean Burzum's attempt turned out lukecold, teehee.
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22.11.2021 - 23:07
Darkside Momo
Retired
Written by Bad English on 21.11.2021 at 20:07

Maybe your best article

What BE said, Radu. Great write-up, I'll have some listening to do thanks to you
And yes, OM
----
My Author's Blog (in French)


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you"

"I've lost too many years now
I'm stealing back my soul
I am awake"
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22.11.2021 - 23:51
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
Written by nikarg on 22.11.2021 at 00:33

Superb stuff, man, well done. Love the intro and the write-ups.

Something tells me that you haven't yet heard and would enjoy listening to Makrothumia.
----
Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


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23.11.2021 - 00:28
nikarg
Mod
Written by RaduP on 22.11.2021 at 23:51

Something tells me that you haven't yet heard and would enjoy listening to Makrothumia.

I haven't but I will. In fact, I haven't listened to most of these albums but I will thanks to the way you wrote this article.
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23.11.2021 - 14:31
Alakazam
yolo grindset
What does OM mean as a phrase specific to Romanians? It was this album that gave me a connection to it and Europe, perhaps an ancient interconnection? Is it viewed exclusively differently from Hindus and Buddhists?
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23.11.2021 - 14:34
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
Written by Alakazam on 23.11.2021 at 14:31

What does OM mean as a phrase specific to Romanians? It was this album that gave me a connection to it and Europe, perhaps an ancient interconnection? Is it viewed exclusively differently from Hindus and Buddhists?

It also means "human" in Romanian.
----
Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


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23.11.2021 - 14:42
Alakazam
yolo grindset
Written by RaduP on 23.11.2021 at 14:34

Written by Alakazam on 23.11.2021 at 14:31

What does OM mean as a phrase specific to Romanians? It was this album that gave me a connection to it and Europe, perhaps an ancient interconnection? Is it viewed exclusively differently from Hindus and Buddhists?

It also means "human" in Romanian.


Thank you, I thought it was from a particularly primordial reference or something. To finally see you reveal what OM, as an album, meant in detail after so long, was nothing short of endearing. I secretly longed for it. I guess that's what passion is meant to be.
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24.11.2021 - 14:52
Valentin B
Iconoclast
Great article, I was never a fan of Negura Bunget but as I see you dug a bit into the "Bungetverse" I felt like mentioning that Dordeduh is a solid as fuck band and along with Bucovina, leading the way of Romanian bands into the international scene.

I met Sol Faur after the show at Josefstadt earlier this year.. at least I think it was him? the keyboard / dulcimer player? he is just so normal and humble, as all of them are
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24.11.2021 - 15:12
Deadsoulman

Their run between 2002 and 2010 is nothing short of stellar, with OM being virtually untouchable. I still can't totally figure out OM, every time I listen to it it seems to develop extra parts, even after all these years.

I am in no way a fan of their early days nor of their post-Vîrstele Pămîntului albums though.

Incidentally, their set at Hellfest 2010 is certainly one of the most hypnotizing, almost transcendental shows I've ever seen.
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24.11.2021 - 15:51
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Written by Deadsoulman on 24.11.2021 at 15:12

Their run between 2002 and 2010 is nothing short of stellar, with OM being virtually untouchable. I still can't totally figure out OM, every time I listen to it it seems to develop extra parts, even after all these years.

I am in no way a fan of their early days nor of their post-Vîrstele Pămîntului albums though.

Incidentally, their set at Hellfest 2010 is certainly one of the most hypnotizing, almost transcendental shows I've ever seen.

You're French men, you know what OM stands for....
----
Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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24.11.2021 - 15:52
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Written by Valentin B on 24.11.2021 at 14:52

Great article, I was never a fan of Negura Bunget but as I see you dug a bit into the "Bungetverse" I felt like mentioning that Dordeduh is a solid as fuck band and along with Bucovina, leading the way of Romanian bands into the international scene.

I met Sol Faur after the show at Josefstadt earlier this year.. at least I think it was him? the keyboard / dulcimer player? he is just so normal and humble, as all of them are

Your re o r of those what stuck whit one genre.
----
Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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24.11.2021 - 16:19
RaduP
CertifiedHipster
Written by Deadsoulman on 24.11.2021 at 15:12

I am in no way a fan of their early days nor of their post-Vîrstele Pămîntului albums though.

Maybe give them another shot?
----
Do you think if the heart keeps on shrinking
One day there will be no heart at all?


2021 goodies
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24.11.2021 - 16:39
Deadsoulman

Written by RaduP on 24.11.2021 at 16:19

Written by Deadsoulman on 24.11.2021 at 15:12

I am in no way a fan of their early days nor of their post-Vîrstele Pămîntului albums though.

Maybe give them another shot?


I guess I could give another try to their early albums. My recollection of them is of being a bit too raw and amateurish, but I admit I haven't listened to them in ages. I haven't tried the final album yet, but judging by your review, chances are if I didn't really enjoy the previous two, I probably won't think too highly of that one. It's on my to-do list anyway.
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24.11.2021 - 16:58
Darkside Momo
Retired
Written by Deadsoulman on 24.11.2021 at 15:12

Incidentally, their set at Hellfest 2010 is certainly one of the most hypnotizing, almost transcendental shows I've ever seen.

And we wrote about it here
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My Author's Blog (in French)


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you"

"I've lost too many years now
I'm stealing back my soul
I am awake"
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24.11.2021 - 17:11
Deadsoulman

Written by Darkside Momo on 24.11.2021 at 16:58

Written by Deadsoulman on 24.11.2021 at 15:12

Incidentally, their set at Hellfest 2010 is certainly one of the most hypnotizing, almost transcendental shows I've ever seen.

And we wrote about it here


Yeah we did
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24.11.2021 - 23:13
BitterCOld
The Ancient One
Written by Deadsoulman on 24.11.2021 at 16:39


I guess I could give another try to their early albums. My recollection of them is of being a bit too raw and amateurish, but I admit I haven't listened to them in ages. I haven't tried the final album yet, but judging by your review, chances are if I didn't really enjoy the previous two, I probably won't think too highly of that one. It's on my to-do list anyway.


Yeah, Marcel sent me a bunch of their earlier albums in one of the Doom Packages. Never totally clicked with me, decent, couple spins, but didn't grab me. At least not until N'Craigu Bitterlui - that was more my speed. Didn't help that OM was my starting point. With Negura Bunget the gap between start and zenith is much steeper than, say, The Cure's first couple albums and Disintegration.
----
get the fuck off my lawn.

Beer Bug Virus Spotify Playlist crafted by Nikarg and I. Feel free to tune in and add some pertinent metal tunes!
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27.11.2021 - 22:19
TenebrisAlas

Amazing work, thanks Radu, i also finally am getting into Negura B, started wiith OM and it was worth the effort...
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