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Getting Into: Summoning


Written by: F3ynman2000, AndyMetalFreak
Published: 14.07.2022


Ever since their publication, J.R.R. Tolkien's famous fantasy novels - The Hobbit, The Lord Of The Rings, and The Silmarillion - have been adapted by various multimedia creators, each with their own style and interpretation of how Middle-Earth should feel like. While the books often had calm, thoughtful moments of reflection, Peter Jackson's movies stressed the action-heavy scenes, while also using the magnificent New Zealand scenery for profound establishing shots. These grand fantasy tales, full of historical lore, would inevitably attract the attention of heavy metal songwriters. While Finnish power metal act Battlelore reveled in the glorious battles of Tolkien's world, Blind Guardian's Nightfall In Middle-Earth showed a light-hearted side with their trademark catchy melodies.

And yet no band would encapsulate the awe-inspiring atmosphere of the Misty Mountains cold, the ancient aura of wizards and Elves, the dire march of Gondorian soldiers, or the grim wickedness of Mordor like Summoning.

Summoning were formed in 1993 by Austrian musicians Silenius, Protector, and Trifixion. Silenius was lead vocalist for the band Abigor during that time, and it was only after the release of Lugburz that the drummer, Trifixion, made his departure from the group. Silenius and Protector have remained a duo ever since. Once Trifixion left, they turned to experimenting with drums played via a keyboard. Soon they even found themselves composing the bass and guitar tracks on the keyboard as well. This decision altered their musical style drastically, slowing down the fast-paced black metal of their debut to a calmer atmospheric approach that heavily relied on mixing synths and keyboards in the studio. As a result, Summoning have never played for a live audience. Despite this, their phenomenal discography has impacted the atmospheric black metal and dark ambient music genres in a way that remains unparalleled to this day.





1995 - Lugburz


Although Summoning are best known for their calm, entrancing musical atmospheres, they began their career as a fairly standard black metal band. With screeching vocals, fast tremolo playing, and very poor production, Lugburz (named after the Dark Tower of Mordor) sounds for the most part like a run-of-the-mill black metal release. Occasional melodic interludes within some songs such as "Flight Of The Nazgul" and "Moondance" offer some contrasting moments, but these are so few and placed seemingly at random throughout the album. This is also the only album that features a real drummer, Trifixion, as they would exclusively use a drum machine for their next albums. Yet having an authentic drummer seems to do the album no favors with its hollow sound and messy playing.

In the albums to come, this Austrian duo would truly discover its own unique style, incorporating more synths and keyboards. Therefore, in retrospect, Lugburz is quite a distinctive album in their discography, on which they hadn't found their signature formula yet. However, the debut does introduce the tradition of starting each full-length release with a dungeon synth instrumental. This acts as a calm before the storm and is my favorite part on their debut. The sound of waves washing over the shore of the Grey Havens accompanied by a sweet melody evokes images of elegant wanderings of Elves across the streaming tide. In sum, Lugburz is a standard black metal release that offers practically no variety and leaves ample opportunity for the band to improve. And improve they definitely do!



Minas Morgul is considered by many (including me) to be the true birth of the band. Released just a few months after their debut, this album offers a surprising jump in quality with vastly improved songwriting and production. More Tolkien themes are incorporated within the lyrics and there are plenty of smooth transitions between calm atmospherics and raw, ferocious black metal. Leading off once more with a mesmerizing dungeon synth track, the album quickly kicks into high gear with the intense "Lugburz", the name perhaps implying that they are continuing right where they left off with their debut. However, already with this track, one can tell how much they've improved. All the instruments are perfectly joining together into one focused effort, with an overlap of haunting synths, wicked tremolo guitar playing, and bursts of thunder acting as percussion. The harsh vocals fit very nicely within the lyrical theme, as he repeats here a spell chanted by an undead barrow-wight in The Fellowship Of The Ring: "Cold be hand and heart and bone, // And cold be sleep under stone: never more to wake // On stony bed, never, till the sun fails // And the moon is dead."

The album spans a wide range of lyrical themes, from the Battle of the Pelennor Fields ("Morthond") to the ride of the Nazgul ("Master Ring"), from an ancient battle with a dragon ("Dagor Bragollach") to the treacherous alliance of the mother of spiders and Middle-Earth's primeval villain ("Ungolianth"). And every time the band provides a fitting musical mood to accompany the story. "Passing Of The Grey Company", for example, heralds the return of the king: Aragorn, son of Arathorn, traveling to Minas Tirith to reign as Gondor's destined ruler. Accordingly, the synth melodies emulating harpsichords sound like a royal procession of a medieval king. While Summoning's later albums would perfect their atmospheric styles, this album displays a unique balance between the grim black metal of the debut, the grand soundscapes to come, and its own catchy, entrancing melodies.


1997 - Dol Guldur


The third release, Dol Guldur, was an ambitious effort, with most songs clocking around or over the ten-minute mark; that's with the exception of the opening instrumental track and the short instrumental "Wyrmwater Glaurung", which was purposely placed to break up the much lengthier tracks. It had become a tradition for Summoning to start albums off with short instrumental tracks such as "Angbands Schmieden"; this I believe was to set the right mood in place for the rest of the album's atmosphere.

Continuing with their trend of linking their successive albums with similar song titles, "Nightshade Forests" has lyrics that are taken straight from "Lugburz" off their previous album. The melodies and song structures are long and repetitive, allowing the atmosphere to build up, which over time can often become too repetitive, and maybe even a chore for some listeners, but for some listeners it's the long, drawn-out atmospherics that draw them to Summoning, although I do believe some tracks could have gotten away with being cut short by a minute or two.

Much like their previous album, Minas Morgul, Dol Guldur is mostly centered around its heavy use of symphonic work, as opposed to guitar work, which they would feature more of on their later albums. This really pays off, even more so than on Minas Morgul, as Summoning manage to capture such a unique soundscape and atmosphere, one that portrays a vivid image in the listeners mind of the majestic lands of Middle-Earth. No other band has been able to capture the same kind of aura in such a way like Summoning, so this set the tone for the rest of what was to become.

The album title of Dol Guldur was taken from the name of Sauron's stronghold in Mirkwood, which was a very eerie, dark, and mystical place in Middle-Earth; it was this that inspired the atmospherics in the music created on this album.



As with all discographies, the EP releases of Summoning shouldn't be ignored. Nightshade Forests is an EP consisting of four songs that were left over from the Dol Guldur sessions.The song "Mirkwood" is for me the best song that never featured on a Summoning full-length album; perhaps it should have been, as the song never quite got the recognition it deserved.

The other three songs on the EP provide consistently good displays of classic Summoning: slow, soothing beats as a sweet yet eerie melody plays in the foreground. One interesting change is that the vocals seem overall deeper on this release, almost leaning more towards death metal than black metal on "Kortirion Among The Trees". Once again Summoning show that despite a somewhat formulaic approach, they still have so many surprises up their sleeves that their exact genre categorization proves to be harder than it first might appear.

As you may have noticed, the tradition of naming their next album after a previously released song continues and in fact ends here. This EP also acts as a transition in lyrical and musical content. Tolkien-themed stories begin to disappear and guitars begin to play a more important role. This culminates in the following release: 1999's Stronghold.


1999 - Stronghold


Stronghold is the first album from Summoning that doesn't reference Tolkien directly. Most of the lyrical content was inspired by or taken from several verses of poems, some in reference to Tolkien; for instance, the title of the opening instrumental track, "Rhûn", is taken from the Elvish word for "east" and was the name used for all lands lying east of Middle-Earth, but in some cases the lyrical themes had no connection with Tolkien. This album also saw a significant change in style from Dol Guldur, as Stronghold was much more guitar-oriented, with the synths focusing on a much more epic and heroic-themed soundscape.

The album also features audio clips taken from films such as Braveheart and Legend, and the song "Where Hope And Daylight Die" features the vocals of Protector's ex-girlfriend Tania Borsky. "Long Lost To Where No Pathway Goes" and "Like Some Snow-White Marble Eyes" are usually considered to be the most memorable songs on this album, and are also amongst the best-known in Summoning's whole discography.

One issue I've found with this album is how distorted the vocals are in the mix. This is clearly noticeable for most listeners, but don't let that put you off the album entirely. I would say this has not only some of the best synth work by Summoning, but also in the history of metal; there's really something quite majestic and powerful about the atmosphere they had created here. The epic closing track, "A Distant Flame Before The Sun", really shows this with its dramatic atmospheric build-up to the heroic melodies and vocals. The song was actually inspired by the "Song Of Eärendil", which was written and performed by Bilbo in Rivendell.



With this release, Summoning returned to their Tolkien-themed lyrics in full force. Many of the songs here relate to the first published story of Middle-Earth, The Hobbit. My personal favorite, "The Hollow Halls Beneath The Fells", puts to music the Dwarven poem of returning to the Misty Mountains cold, leaving ere break of day to regain their dragon-guarded ancestral treasure. Overall, I think Let Mortal Heroes Sing Your Fame is the most approachable Summoning album for new listeners. Clocking in at "only" 56 minutes, it is Summoning's second shortest release to date (followed by the debut) and therefore doesn't get too tiresome. The songs never overstay their welcome and provide clear, easily discernible melodies. The vocals are also less intense and are reduced often to a mere whisper as the instrumentation takes center-stage. The insertion of clips of old radio broadcasts of The Lord Of The Rings is a very original touch that makes the album more nuanced and multifaceted than any of their other work.

While all previous releases start with a sweet dungeon-synth melody, this album begins with a menacing war anthem. The Nazgûl, the Dark Lord's most terrible servants, chant the infamous ring verse in the Black Speech that can be translated as "One Ring to rule them all and in the darkness bind them". This is followed by an ominous instrumental, trumpets blaring, drums pounding as one begins to envision a monstrous army of Orcs marching into battle. This rise of evil is met in "South Away" with a triumphant battle cry of the proud horse-masters of Rohan: "Hail, hail now, King of the Mark!" The following four songs describe the outcast dwarves seeking to return to their ancestral home in the Lonely Mountain with audio samples sprinkled in to draw the listener further in. You almost get the sensation of wandering down the shadowy halls of Moria as you hear Gandalf croak, "follow me… into the darkness".

The last song, "Farewell", is the first hint at a trend that takes shape in the later albums of Summoning's career. Ever willing to experiment, the Austrian duo began incorporating poems into their lyrics that weren't written by Tolkien, but nonetheless fit into Tolkien's world. In "Farewell", the lyrics heavily imply an inspiration from Irish folklore, namely the Song Of Amergin. In both that poem and this song, phrases like "Who can tell you the age of the moon… who can change the shapes of the hills - but I can!" and "I can shift my shape like a god" invoke images of an ancient powerful being - is that Sauron speaking, gloating over his power? That is the beauty of Summoning: they give just enough information to grab your interest, but leave so much unspecified to keep you guessing.


2003 - Lost Tales


Lost Tales is the second EP released by Summoning and includes only two tracks, "Arcenstone", and "Saruman", which sound vastly different from one another. The EP is rather mellow and experimental compared with the rest of Summoning's work, with no vocals or guitars present. It was completely synthesized, and vocal samples from The Lord Of The Rings films were used.

The song "Arcenstone" was originally written for the darkwave project Silenius called Mirkwood, although the project never released anything, and the song "Saruman", was left over from the Dol Guldur sessions in 1996, just as the earlier EP Nightshade Forests contained other leftover songs from the same sessions.


2006 - Oath Bound


Oath Bound is Summoning's longest full-length studio album and also contains their longest song, "Land Of The Dead", featuring a full choir, which was used previously only on the song "Farewell" from the previous album, Let Mortal Heroes Sing Your Fame.

There is a heavy use of layered symphonics, with various added sound effects, as well as the guitar work, so the production had to be approached in a way to consider all of these elements in place, the vocals and guitars are much further back in the mix, which may not have pleased some listeners, but for me this allowed the symphonics to shine through more, thus creating one of the most dynamic, vibrant, and atmospheric albums in their discography, so I've personally never seen the production as so much of an issue, even with the vocals being slightly mumbled.

The intro involves the primeval villain of Tolkien's world, Morgoth, or "Bauglir", the tyrant, cursing the steadfast hero Hurin, damning him to watch in despair as his children are cruelly punished. It also features the lengthy atmospheric song "Beleriand", the name that was given to the land in which The Silmarillion was set, as well as the mighty impressive "Mirautas Vras", a song written entirely in the Black Speech of Mordor; the song also uses the impressive Nazgul sound effects, as well as horn sounds that also featured on the song "Menegroth". You may notice a similar riff pattern to the songs "Northward", "Might And Glory", and "Land Of The Dead"; these melodious riffs are a new added feature to the song structures, and the riff style would then be used on their next albums with even greater effect.

The album title Oath Bound is a reference to the blasphemous Oath of Fëanor, from the story of The Silmarillion. The lyrical themes mostly portray a vivid and imaginative soundscape of Middle-Earth, and the lyrics focus on the adventures and legends of The Silmarillion in reference to the Oath of Fëanor, unlike Stronghold, where they focused on other poetic works outside their usual Tolkien theme. The album cover is The Mountain In The Mist, a painting by Albert Bierstadt, which was inspired by the scenery of Jotenheim in Norway, so the painting itself has no reference to Tolkien, but for me it does make a perfect background for the album's atmospheric setting. There's something about that mystical mountain coming through the mist across the water that draws you right in when listening to the opening song "Across The Streaming Tide".



It would be a seven-year gap from the release of Oath Bound before Summoning released Old Mornings Dawn. This was due to Silenius suffering from ill health (specifically, a heart attack), as well as the band members having other side projects and commitments. Nevertheless, by this stage, [band]Summoning/band] had clearly decided to stick to their same formula, using the familiar song structures and melodies that had previously worked so well for them.

Although Old Mornings Dawn isn't necessarily a concept album, the lyrical themes are mostly centered around the stories and legends of Eärendil, the half-man, half-Eldar and ancestor of the Kings of Numenor. The most notable songs for me are "Wandering Fire", "Flammifer", and "Caradhras" (the highest peak in the Misty Mountain range).

The production also has several notable changes, the guitar-work being much thicker in sound and the riffs having become heavier and more distinctive. Nevertheless, the familiar symphonics are still clearly there in abundance, containing choirs, trumpet sounds, and several medieval instruments like the lute, which were mostly inspired by old Elven folklore. The vocals are also higher in the mix, and have become a lot clearer in sound, so overall I would say this is their best-produced album, with all the elements coming together in much crisper and clearer sound quality than previous albums.

However, some areas have been under criticism for becoming too tedious in parts; "Old Mornings Dawn" (the title track), "White Tower", and "Of Pale White Morns and Darkened Eves" are most notable for falling into this trap.



This album saw significant changes to the production and sound, most notably the deeper guitar tone and the much heavier sound of the drumming. The album title itself could well have suggested that they opted for a doomier approach, but on the other hand, the melodies, songwriting, and overall song structures seem to be a continuation from Old Mornings Dawn. The band also described this album as the little brother to Old Mornings Dawn, because a lot of the ideas for the album had been initially thought of during those sessions, so in truth you could say this was never going to live up to the standards of what the band had previously produced.

The main downside to this album for me is the vocals, which I would say are much higher in the mix this time. The synths also don't seem to have as much effect as on previous albums either, as the guitar work had clearly taken priority.

For me "Silvertine" is a standout track; the name derives from a peak in the Misty Mountain range of Middle-Earth, much like the song "Caradhras" from the previous album, which was also the name of another peak from the same mountain range. Both songs also have a similar riff melody, as well as a similar song structure to them, so this to me would suggest that the two songs are within a set theme of each other. This album also features more poems from authors other than Tolkien, such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Edgar Allen Poe.




In conclusion, to classify Summoning simply as atmospheric black metal would do them a disservice, since what this Austrian duo has released in 20 years is such a unique experience that cannot be compared to any other band. With a baffling consistency of quality, they haven't shied away from experimenting and pushing the boundaries of how Tolkien's beloved world can be represented in the metal medium. Mesmerizing atmospheres, glorious battle hymns, icy spells of darkness - Summoning present all of these in such unparalleled and expertly crafted fashion as if they were composed by the Elves themselves. Simply put, Summoning represent a musical style as rare and valuable as the mithril silver lying at the roots of Misty Mountains cold or a Silmaril shining in the depths of sapphire seas.





Guest article disclaimer:
This is a guest article, which means it does not necessarily represent the point of view of the MS Staff.


Comments

Comments: 28   Visited by: 152 users
14.07.2022 - 15:00
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Maybe one of best articles in a genre, best written and one of coolest bands. Good job man.
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Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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14.07.2022 - 15:29
EloZ

Great band and great review. Album by album a journey through the enchanted forests of Summoning. It is great time to give the World a new chapter in this fantastic, poetic history. Hail Summoning!
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14.07.2022 - 15:31
Redel

Such a great article, what an excellent writing. Thanks a lot guys and keep 'em coming.
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14.07.2022 - 16:21
nonZero

Fantastic article! Great to read your thoughts on each of the albums from Summoning. Hail!
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My Favourite Albums (ordered & rated)
Top 200 Overlooked Albums (with genres)
So I Heard You Like Wintersun... (Time II find new bands)
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15.07.2022 - 10:41
Silent Creeper
Senile Veteran
I would say some ratings are a bit low but otherwise great article.
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15.07.2022 - 14:12
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
Written by Silent Creeper on 15.07.2022 at 10:41

I would say some ratings are a bit low but otherwise great article.

Thanks I was torn on whether to give Stronghold a 5 star or not, there was a time when I found that album perfect, but over time I gradually began to find minor faults, same goes for Old Mornings Dawn, which unfortunately just fell short of top marks too.
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15.07.2022 - 16:55
nepalski

To be honest I could never get into Summoning. It's not that I don't like them, I have a lot of respect for them, but something feels off whenever I listen to their albums.
Because of this article, I may give them another try. Brilliant read.
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16.07.2022 - 01:10
Brutal Water

Heh, this article came out the same day I received my copy of that super limited box set of the latest album with the bonus disc and whatnot and thus completed my Summoning collection (save for all the tapes they did early on). No introduction necessary for me anymore, lol.

Anyway, great article. I recommend opening up a tab for a Tolkien wiki to look up what some of the songs are about as you're listening to them (or just read the books, because they're pretty fucking metal anyway). "Herumor" for example gave me goosebumps once I was done with the Downfall of Numenor story/chapter in The Silmarilion. These guys sure know their Tolkien.
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That is not dead which can eternal lie,
And with strange aeons even death may die.
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16.07.2022 - 01:22
blackwreath13

Excellent read, I'm not familiar with Summoning yet so this will be most useful to me. Already fawning over those landscapes, cheers.
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16.07.2022 - 01:32
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
Written by blackwreath13 on 16.07.2022 at 01:22

Excellent read, I'm not familiar with Summoning yet so this will be most useful to me. Already fawning over those landscapes, cheers.

Thanks You should definitely check them out.
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16.07.2022 - 01:42
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
Written by Brutal Water on 16.07.2022 at 01:10

Heh, this article came out the same day I received my copy of that super limited box set of the latest album with the bonus disc and whatnot and thus completed my Summoning collection (save for all the tapes they did early on). No introduction necessary for me anymore, lol.

Anyway, great article. I recommend opening up a tab for a Tolkien wiki to look up what some of the songs are about as you're listening to them (or just read the books, because they're pretty fucking metal anyway). "Herumor" for example gave me goosebumps once I was done with the Downfall of Numenor story/chapter in The Silmarilion. These guys sure know their Tolkien.

What are the chances eh And your right these guys sure do know their stuff about Tolkien.
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16.07.2022 - 08:29
Bad English
Tage Westerlund
Written by AndyMetalFreak on 16.07.2022 at 01:42

Written by Brutal Water on 16.07.2022 at 01:10

Heh, this article came out the same day I received my copy of that super limited box set of the latest album with the bonus disc and whatnot and thus completed my Summoning collection (save for all the tapes they did early on). No introduction necessary for me anymore, lol.

Anyway, great article. I recommend opening up a tab for a Tolkien wiki to look up what some of the songs are about as you're listening to them (or just read the books, because they're pretty fucking metal anyway). "Herumor" for example gave me goosebumps once I was done with the Downfall of Numenor story/chapter in The Silmarilion. These guys sure know their Tolkien.

What are the chances eh And your right these guys sure do know their stuff about Tolkien.

90s metalheads had more books as influences, they knew more, read more as todays people, IQ was higher
----
Life is to short for LOVE, there is many great things to do online !!!

Stormtroopers of Death - ''Speak English or Die''

I better die, because I never will learn speek english, so I choose dieing
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16.07.2022 - 09:01
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
Written by Bad English on 16.07.2022 at 08:29

90s metalheads had more books as influences, they knew more, read more as todays people, IQ was higher

There could be some truth in that, eventhough we now have access to the Internet, where we can find out everything about anything, there is something about taking the time to read through his books, Tolkien's work has inspired generations of musicians and film makers, and most importantly RPG games Summoning brings his world to life just as much as the films did.
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16.07.2022 - 20:14
Qualeen

Thanks for this article guys. Lots of interesting information previously unknown to me up there. I had no knowledge of the references to Poe and Waldo Emerson on With Doom We Come, nor was I even aware of the existence of Lost Tales. The writing is great, unsurprisingly
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Non serviam.
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17.07.2022 - 12:23
X-Ray Rod
Skandino
Great article and overall compelling read! What I appreciate the most are all the details surrounding the song's inspirations in regards to Tolkien and othwer authors. I admit I have not read any of the books by Tolkien. Only seen the movies. I tried to read The Fellowship Of The Ring but I was 12 years old. Needless to say that I gave up pretty quickly. I still have the books though so one day I will read them for sure. They are in Spanish though, now I would prefer to read the original English version.

In regards to the music discussion I think I agree with the general vibe of the writing but not entirely so my ratings are different (lower for the most part with two exceptions).

Lugburz: At least a 3/5 for me. I consider this an underrated album but it's natural considering that the fanbase isn't usually into rawer black metal. What I disagree is mostly in regards to the term "run-of-the-mill". Well, I do agree that is not as unique as what followed but you can clearly hear it's Summoning. I find it a very interesting album in regards to the melodies involved which you can hear more in the guitars than the keyboards. The riffing on "Flight Of The Nazgul" is excellent. I also disagree with what you say about the drummer. Sure, Summoning worked way better with drum machines but I consider Trifixion's performance to be very violent and effective. And on a track like "Where Winters Forever Cry" the whole ordeal gets very unique with a danceable beat. This track i worth mentioning just for the beats alone. The vocals are also particularly disguting and they never sounded like this again. Their most "orc" sound by far and some of the high-pitched shrieks could have been used in the future. It's a rough album but it's till mandatory listening for Summoning fans.

Minas Morgul: 4,5/5 for me. Pretty much agree with everything you wrote here. Excellent album

Dol Guldur: Eh, I knock it down to a 3 or 3,5/5 depending on the mood. Dol Guldur has no business being this long. The first 4 proper songs all over 10 mins each? I don't think so. I really like the ongs by themelves but it does feel too long for its own good. You could knock it down by almost 20 minutes and you would get an album that could have easily been among the very best. I will give it a cloer listening though. As it is the album I listen to the least just for the tracklisting alone.

Nightshade Forests: a 3,5 /5 for me. I agree with the writing though. It's a great EP and brings a different production to the table that turns out to be quite successful. Very bassy sound. Guitars could be more upfront.

Stronghold: 5/5 for me. To me this IS their best produced album, not Old Mornings Dawn which has a thinner sound by comparison. Stronghold amped up the riffs which really paid off as the album contains some of their most memorable riffs. A perfect balance in this album between the guitars and synths.

Let Mortal Heroes Sing Your Fame: 5/5. This one and Stronghold are the best Summoning. Period. I love how triumphant it feels (while Stronghold was considerably more somber). Once again the guitars take a step back but they made up for it with their best songwriting. Farewell is easily their best closing song. It was their first use of choirs and it is still their absolute best use of it!!!

Lost Tales: Agree with your text. I might even knock it down to a 2/5. Just not interesting and the sound is at times even shitty with "Saruman".

Oath Bound: 4,5/5 for me. The riffs have been taken even further back but I just love how they sound like a waterfall of melodies on top of each other. It's even drone-like in tracks such as "Might and glory". And the clearer sound of the synthwork makes this album feel way more of a movie than any of the other albums.

Old Mornings Dawn: 3,5 or 4 out of 5 depending on the mood. At this point I felt they were getting stagnant. One of the albums I listened to the least though.

With Doom We Come: N/A I actually havent listened to this album yet! Many reviews made me feel like it was not worth it though. Specially with all the comments on the production.


I did not expect to write this much. It wasn't meant to take the spotlight or anything. I've come to truly appreciate this band these last couple of years jut because there is no band like it and all the copycats have failed so far. Thank you for the writing and hope you guys keep on it!!!
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Written by BloodTears on 19.08.2011 at 18:29
Like you could kiss my ass
Written by Milena on 20.06.2012 at 10:49
Rod, let me love you.
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17.07.2022 - 13:02
F3ynman2000
Nocturnal Bro
Written by X-Ray Rod on 17.07.2022 at 12:23

Great article and overall compelling read!
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Thank you for the writing and hope you guys keep on it!!!

Thanks for your comment!

I did try to like their debut, now that I've also been exposed to rawer black metal. But, compared to other black metal acts of the mid 90s - and especially compared to the rest of Summoning's discography - Lugburz had far too few moments that made it really stand out for me. Like I said, the rest of the album couldn't reach the high expectations set by that majestic synth intro.

I'm glad you like Minas Morgul and Let Mortal Heroes Sing Your Fame - those are definitely my favorites

Thanks for sharing a different opinion - after all, what is a metal discussion without a bit of disagreement?

You should definitely read J.R.R Tolkien - and preferably in the original English. I had also only watched the movies first and had only read the Hobbit as a kid. About two years ago I was rereading the Hobbit and decided I wanted to read the sequel. So I started reading The Lord Of The Rings. The Fellowship does start off pretty slow, especially if you're used to the pace of the movies. But hold on until you reach The Council Of Elrond. After that the story really takes off!

I actually had first been turned off so much by the slow beginning that I switched to reading The Silmarillion! A lot of people say it's super difficult to understand because there are all these dynasties of Elves with similar names, but I took an instant liking to it! It's got it all - a creation myth, the rise of evil, the "Fall" of the Elves (kind of like leaving the Garden of Eden), a century-spanning war of deception, colossal battles, and sacrifice. It's a true tragic tale, but as Tolkien basically came up with it before writing LOTR, he references The Silmarillion constantly in LOTR. So at least for me it helped knowing the Silmarillion before continuing with reading LOTR. But, if you don't know the Silmarillion before reading LOTR, that's also OK - all the references become mysteries that just add to the immersive feeling of Middle-Earth.

Anyways, sorry for the long reply.
I'm glad you enjoyed the article, and I think Andy and I are far from retiring
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17.07.2022 - 14:50
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
Written by X-Ray Rod on 17.07.2022 at 12:23


I did not expect to write this much. It wasn't meant to take the spotlight or anything. I've come to truly appreciate this band these last couple of years jut because there is no band like it and all the copycats have failed so far. Thank you for the writing and hope you guys keep on it!!!

Thanks for your feed back, support, and appreciation for this article I totally agree that their is no band like this, they are so unique, and great at what they do, a one off band if you ask me. There are plenty of copycats out there, whom have tried and failed to capture that real essence and atmosphere that Summoning possessed.
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19.07.2022 - 08:24
nikarg
Mod
Hey, look what became possible



Seriously now, congratulations guys, this is really splendid work. I loved reading it all, and there is also a lot of information that I didn't know here. As for the music, Stronghold and Let Mortal Heroes Sing Your Fame are unsurprisingly my favourite albums by Summoning. Indeed, a truly unique and pioneering band.

Once again, well done!
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19.07.2022 - 22:11
akerbeltz

Thanks man. Just reading it and I wanted to listen again to Summoning
Great article about one (if not the) of the greatest less known band ever.
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19.07.2022 - 22:30
F3ynman2000
Nocturnal Bro
Written by akerbeltz on 19.07.2022 at 22:11

Thanks man. Just reading it and I wanted to listen again to Summoning
Great article about one (if not the) of the greatest less known band ever.

Awesome! Thanks for breaking your 9 year silence with this comment!
Have fun diving back into the magical realm of Summoning
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24.07.2022 - 01:05
M C Vice
ex-polydactyl
Is it a sign of Summoning's influence that 'summoning' is a tag on Bandcamp?
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"Another day, another Doug."
"I'll fight you on one condition. That you lower your nipples."
" 'Tis a lie! Thy backside is whole and ungobbled, thou ungrateful whelp!"
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24.07.2022 - 01:25
F3ynman2000
Nocturnal Bro
Written by M C Vice on 24.07.2022 at 01:05

Is it a sign of Summoning's influence that 'summoning' is a tag on Bandcamp?

https://bandcamp.com/tag/summoning
nicely spotted! That goes to show just how unique of a style Summoning established!
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24.07.2022 - 10:32
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
Written by F3ynman2000 on 24.07.2022 at 01:25

Written by M C Vice on 24.07.2022 at 01:05

Is it a sign of Summoning's influence that 'summoning' is a tag on Bandcamp?

https://bandcamp.com/tag/summoning
nicely spotted! That goes to show just how unique of a style Summoning established!

Summoning are that unique that it seems they have created their own metal genre
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27.07.2022 - 16:56
Arcticus

I haven't listened to Summoning yet, although I am definitely planning to after reading this - I am a pretty huge Tolkien fan after all and they have been on my radar for a while. I wondered what people's thoughts are on Caladan Brood, who seem to be doing basically the same thing but for Steven Erikson's "Malazan Book of the Fallen" series of books - I saw a couple of their albums had some good ratings somewhere (rateyourmusic maybe) but again haven't got around to listening to them.

Great article and keep it up! The "Getting Into" series is so frickin' great for lazy bastards like me
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27.07.2022 - 18:15
AndyMetalFreak
A Nice Guy
You should definitely check Summoning out especially if your a Tolkien fan, and also a fan of black metal of the atmospheric kind too and yes you should check out Caladan Brood too if you can, they are great, and the closest band your going to get to sounding like Summoning without being a rip off.
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28.07.2022 - 22:40
Ellrohir
Heaven Knight
Totally agree with that overview
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My rest seems now calm and deep
Finally I got my dead man sleep


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04.08.2022 - 03:23
no one

Great article!

I really need to try harder with summoning, ive only really put in a full effort with night shade forest (probably because of its length)which I really liked, but always tried other albums on the way to work or something, I feel like these albums need there full attention all the way through to capture the atmosphere.
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04.08.2022 - 13:45
F3ynman2000
Nocturnal Bro
Written by no one on 04.08.2022 at 03:23

Great article!

I really need to try harder with summoning, ive only really put in a full effort with night shade forest (probably because of its length)which I really liked, but always tried other albums on the way to work or something, I feel like these albums need there full attention all the way through to capture the atmosphere.

Try Let Mortal Heroes Sing Your Fame. I think it's the easiest to get into, even though I personally started with Minas Morgul
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